LAVENDER’S MEDICINAL AND AROMATHERAPY USES

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

There are few scents in this world that evoke the feeling of clean – lavender is one of them. Its common and scientific name originates from lavare, the Latin word for wash or bathe. Lavender was popular as a linen-washing herb in Europe, no doubt due to its pleasant aroma, but it also possesses antiseptic qualities and can help to keep insects at bay. Discouraging or killing insects was paramount before the invention of glass windows and screens, a time when humans often shared the same roof with flea and lice-ridden livestock. Maude Grieve writes in A Modern Herbal (no longer especially modern, as it was written in 1931):

Dried Lavender flowers are still greatly used to perfume linen, their powerful, aromatic odour acting also as a preventative to the attacks of moths and other insects. In America, they find very considerable employment for disinfecting hot rooms and keeping away…

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HSA Webinar: Growing and Using Herbs of the Southwestern Missions

The Herb Society of America Blog

Author Jacqueline Soule will be presenting this month’s webinar on Wed, March 25 at 1pm – click here to register. This article is excerpted from her book, Father Kino’s Herbs: Growing and Using Them Today.

Epazote – An Efficacious ‘Erbcover kino

By Dr. Jacqueline A. Soule

Did you know that you can speak at least one word of Nahuatl, the language spoken in Mexico pre-conquest? Epazote is the Nahuatl name for Dysphania ambrosioides (formerly Chenopodium ambrosioides). English common names include wormseed, Jesuit tea, American wormseed, Mexican tea, and Jerusalem oak.

By the time of contact between the New and Old Worlds, epazote had been cultivated for well over a thousand years in southern and southeast coastal Mexico.  It was, and still is, a principal flavoring for a large number of Yucatan and Veracruz dishes and is indispensable for cooking black beans.

Epazote in Cooking

Like the Old World herbs…

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March Equinox Reading 2020

March is one huge deal of a month and truly the mark of some significant endings and beginnings taking place. The Equinox falls on the 19th as the Sun enters Aries and comes into a conjunction with Chiron, squaring the Nodes. This comet so named after the Greek centaur is a both a symbol of suffering and strength, where healing abilities coexist with a wound that must be endured, and perhaps, eventually dissolved.

Chiron in Aries indicates a kind of collective identity crisis is taking place and that as awareness of the issues at hand and what is behind them begins to grow, so does a collective sense of anger and uprising. And maybe that’s what needs to happen, in order to set some very twisted things straight on this planet. A conflict lies between self-preservation and greed, and this not only entails the masses but the power elite…

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