22 Trees That Can Be Tapped For Sap And Syrup | Wild Foodism

maplespilewildfoodism2As winter wanes and spring approaches, wild foodists all across North America tap into the time-honored tradition of sugar production – mainly, the transformation of maple tree sap into maple syrup and sugar.  This process, passed on from the Native Americans to the early settlers, is still quite popular today, and is responsible for one of the few wild foods that can be purchased commercially in most supermarkets.

Most people associate syrup with the maple tree, and although much of today’s syrup does originate from the sugar maple, all species of maple can be tapped.  Even better, many other trees from other genera can be tapped to extract sap, which ultimately can be turned into delicious syrup.

In this post, I won’t be discussing the methods involved in tapping for sugar production.  If you are unfamiliar with the process, there are a variety of great websites, videos, and books to guide you.  Rather, I would like to provide a list of various trees (maples, birches, walnuts, etc.) that you can tap successfully to yield wonderful, sugary products. […]

Read the entire post at its Source: 22 Trees That Can Be Tapped For Sap And Syrup | Wild Foodism

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Thistle Soup Recipe – Good Witches Homestead

This Thistle Soup Recipe is made using edible food from the wild.

Make thistle soup by chopping (scissoring would be a better word since an old pair of shears is the best thing I’ve found for cutting up green plants) a pan of thistles. Push them down in the pan and add just enough water to cover the plants. Bring to a boil and let simmer for at least twenty minutes. Now you can season this soup and eat it just as it is or you can add some boiled fish, leftover rice or anything else you happen to have. It’s guaranteed to be good and you can use this stock in a stew. […]

Read the entire post at the Source: Thistle Soup Recipe – Good Witches Homestead