The Individual vs. the Staged Collective

Jon Rappoport's Blog

The Individual vs. the Staged Collective

by Jon Rappoport

July 9, 2017

Trumpets blare. In the night sky, spotlights roam. A great confusion of smoke and dust and fog, and emerging banners, carrying the single message:

WE.

The great meltdown of all consciousness into a glob of utopian simplicity…

There are denizens among us.

They present themselves as the Normals.

Beyond all political objectives, there is a simple fact: those group-mind addicts who have given up their souls will rage against the faintest appearance of one who tries to keep his. And in this rage, the soulless ones will try to pull the other down to where they live.

And somehow, it all looks normal and proper and rational.

In the 1950s, before television had numbed minds and turned them into jelly, there was a growing sense of: the Individual versus the Corporate State.

Something needed to be done. People…

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Maps of consciousness as a form of mind control

Outside the Reality Machine

Maps of consciousness as a form of mind control

By Jon Rappoport

Let’s start here.  There are maybe five people on the planet, if that, who genuinely want to contemplate existence and DO NOTHING ELSE.

Everyone else WANTS TO DO SOMETHING.

Since civilization dawned on Earth, various teachers and groups have been making maps about consciousness and how it works and operates.  A thousand groups and a million teachers, and they all have some kind of map of consciousness that supposedly yields up crucial insight.

Let’s cut to the chase.  If a person is using one of those maps and finds it helps him DO WHAT HE TRULY WANTS TO DO in his life, GOOD.

Good, assuming he isn’t kidding himself about what he really wants to do.

If he uses a map to sit around and do very little, and he isn’t one of those five people I mentioned…

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~ When Freedom Comes With A Price ~

By Amy Brucker

I just got back from a two week adventure in Colorado during which 135 of my closest relatives gathered from every corner of the continent to attend a family reunion.

After our Friday night dinner, I gave a presentation about our genealogy and how ourancestors were instrumental in the shaping of American Independence, and how that freedom came with a price.

Filled with hope and a vision, my ancestors came to the New World looking for freedom, but what they found was a hard road paved with loss and devastation. As Independence Day approaches, their stories are a relevant reminder of the cost of freedom.

The Cost of Freedom

During my presentation, I shared that our ancestors came over on the Mayflower in 1620, and how Susana White, our many-times-great-grandmother, was one of only four women who lived through the first winter, thanks to the Wampanoag who helped them survive.

I talked about how our ancestors were the subject of the Eames Family Massacre in Framingham, MA in 1676 during the King Philip’s War. How my many-times-great-grandmother, Mary Padelford Eames, and five of her children were massacred by Nipmuc Indians, and how we are the direct descendants of the only child who survived and had children.

I shared how our many-times-great-grandfather, Jacob Barney, lived next to the physician who examined the accused during the witch trials of 1692, and how the Barney family donated two acres of land to the Village of Salem to be used as a school, and then mysteriously moved far away, just as as the trials were beginning in April.

I then shared how our ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, and the Civil War, and how my great-great-grandfather was part of the Eighth Cavalry who was instrumental in capturing and slaying Sitting Bull, a Holy Man whose greatest desire was to ensure the health and wellbeing of his clan.

My family was instrumental in shaping the “Independence of America”, but it’s a freedom that comes with a price.

There are many sides to every story and the shaping of America is no different.

Wampanoag and Nipmuc Indians wanted to live in harmony with the land, keep their traditions alive, and honor their agreements with the colonists.

Pilgrims wanted a safe place to practice their religion, raise families in accordance with their beliefs, and cultivate a place of belonging that was independent of political influence.

When these two worlds collided it resulted in tenuous friendships followed by bloody battles and devastating losses on both sides.

As Americans everywhere celebrate Independence Day this Fourth of July, remember that our freedom comes with a price. Every story has many sides, and the opposition isn’t really the enemy, but a person or people who are trying to assure their safety, belonging, and worth as a human, and sometimes their quest night seem at odds with your own.

Knowing Where You Come From Shapes Your Perception

We can’t change our past, but we can change how we perceive people whose values and outlook on life are different than ours. We all want safety, belonging, and to feel worthy. These are basic human needs.

True freedom comes from understanding that the power of our purpose, the reasons why we are here, do not have to impede on the freedom of others, and that there is always a way for all people to thrive.

The challenge is that the answer may not be obvious. We may have to examine our past in order to understand why we see the world the way we do, and then remember that there is always more than one perspective, each of which can be true.

As we move forward with our independence, with freedoms others may seek to deny, we need to look for soulutions we haven’t seen before. What answers are standing right before us? What haven’t we seen?

Sweet dreaming,

Amy

Independence Day … a Few Facts

Oro Cas Reflects

Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?

Five signers were captured by the British as traitors, and tortured before they died.

Twelve had their homes ransacked and burned. Two lost their sons serving in the Revolutionary Army; another had two sons captured.

Nine of the 56 fought and died from wounds or hardships of the Revolutionary War.

They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.

What kind of men were they?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists. Eleven were merchants, nine were farmers and large plantation owners; men of means, well educated. But they signed the of Independence knowing full well that the penalty would be death if they were captured.

Carter Braxton of Virginia, a wealthy planter and trader, saw his ships swept from the seas by the British Navy. He sold his home and properties…

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Leftist celebs flirt with violence, get it on baseball field

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Leftist celebs flirt with violence, get it on baseball field

By Jon Rappoport

The shooter, Hodgkinson, is dead. Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, a congressional staffer, a lobbyist, and a US Capitol policeman were wounded. Without the presence of Scalise’s Capitol Police security detail, there would have been a massacre of Republican congressmen.

Political Left celebs never meant for THIS to happen. They were just playing. They were just virtue signaling. Having fun. They’re kids in the sandbox. Sure.

Kathy Griffin holds the blood-soaked decapitated head of Trump. Just a joke. Snoop Dogg releases a music video in which he shoots a toy gun at a clown dressed as Trump. Just satire. The prestigious Public Theater in New York City stages Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar with a Caesar who looks like Trump, who is assassinated. Artistic commentary. Comedian Sarah Silverman tweets, “WAKE UP & JOIN THE RESISTANCE. ONCE THE MILITARY IS…

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When it starts with you, not with the world

Jon Rappoport's Blog

When it starts with you, not with the world

By Jon Rappoport

I’ve always conceived of my work as “up one side, down the other.” Expose the roots of the major covert ops of our time; expose the power of the individual to mount his own “op” for a better future.

In this journey of many years, I’ve come to a conclusion: a person looking at the world to obtain clues about his own potential and power is looking through the wrong end of the telescope. He’s bound to come to wrong decisions.

He skirts the edge of: I can’t succeed because the corrupt world is organized to fail.

This idea takes you into the morass, into the quicksand.

Yes, a person needs to understand what is going on at a deep level in the world—this is vital, but it’s a prelude. A beginning.

The real meaning of power is…

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Individual power in a decaying world

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Individual power in a decaying world

by Jon Rappoport

June 8, 2017

I wrote these notes before putting together my second and third collections, Exit From The Matrix and Power Outside The Matrix:

“Solutions to private problems and public problems require the ability to think things through, logically, and to reject what is unworkable or biased—but above and beyond that, a person needs to be able to imagine solutions that haven’t been tried before. He can’t keep asking other people to invent solutions for him. This is the hardest lesson. The habit of demanding that others come up with answers, that others find a way out of the tunnel—this habit is based on the assumption that one’s own power of imagination is grossly limited, which is a lie. You might say it is the central lie.”

“The world says defect from your own power. Never find out what…

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Australia: marijuana doctor arrested for helping children

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Australia: marijuana doctor arrested for helping children

The Australian underground is growing

by Jon Rappoport

June 5, 2017

Crazzfiles.com has the story (5/31):

“Dr Andrew Katelaris, will appear in the Hornsby Local Court today after being arrested yesterday.”

“Chief Inspector David Hogg confirmed to Echonetdaily that Dr. Katelaris had been charged with a number of offences including drug possession, having an indictable quantity of cannabis, and having proceeds of crime.”

“On Sunday Dr Katelaris featured in a Channel Seven report in which he was shown giving cannabis oil to a four-year-old boy, who has since been taken from his parents.”

“He had spent the weekend at a Hemp Industry forum at Rosehill in Sydney, where police arrived on the final day after reports that a large crop of cannabis was on display.”

“No arrests were made as the ‘cannabis display’, which consisted of low-THC plants for hemp production, had been…

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The vision of technocracy ~ Jon Rappoport

by Jon Rappoport

“Well, boys, we’ve got this strange thing called THE INDIVIDUAL. Could somebody tell me what he is? He’s not conforming to our algorithms. He’s all over the place. And while we’re at it, what the hell is this IMAGINATION? It keeps slipping out of our grasp, it doesn’t fit the plan…”

PART ONE

—Technocrats say they want to wipe out poverty, war, and inequality. But in order to achieve these lofty goals (or pretend to), they need to re-program humans—

Technocracy is the basic agenda and plan for ruling global society from above, so we need to understand it from several angles.

Consider a group of enthusiastic forward-looking engineers in the early 20th century. They work for a company that has a contract to manufacture a locomotive.

This is a highly complex piece of equipment.

On one level, workers are required to make the components to spec. Then they must put them all together. These tasks are formidable.

On another level, various departments of the company must coordinate their efforts. This is also viewed as a technological job. Organizing is considered a technology.

When the locomotive is finished and delivered, and when it runs on its tracks and pulls a train, a great and inspiring victory is won.

And then…the engineers begin to think about the implications. Suppose the locomotive was society itself? Suppose society was the finished product? Couldn’t society be put together in a coordinated fashion? And couldn’t the “technology of organizing things” be utilized for the job?

Why bother with endlessly arguing and lying politicians? Why should they be in charge? Isn’t that an obvious losing proposition? Of course it is.

Engineers could lay out and build a future society that would benefit all people. Disease and poverty could be wiped out. Eliminating them would be part of the blueprint.

This “insight” hit engineers and technicians like a ton of bricks. Of course! All societies had been failures for the same reason: the wrong people were in charge.

Armed with this new understanding, engineers of every stripe began to see what was needed. A revolution in thinking about societal organization. Science was the new king. And science would rule.

Of course, for an engineered world to work, certain decisions would have to be made about the role of the individual. Every individual. You couldn’t have an air-tight plan if every human were free to pursue his own objectives. Too many variables. Too much confusion. Too much conflict. Well, that problem could be solved. The individual’s actions would be tailored to fit the coordinated operations of the planned society.

The individual would be “one of the components of the locomotive.” His life would be connected to other lives to produce an exemplary shape.

Yes, this could imply a few problems, but those problems could be worked out. They would have to be worked out, because the overriding goal was the forming of a world organization. What would you do if one bolt (an individual human) in one wheel of a locomotive was the wrong size? You would go back and correct the error. You would re-make the bolt.

Among technocrats, the overall vision superseded the glaring need to “remake” individuals who would fit in. It was perfectly all right to re-program the individual.

Other people entered the game. High-echelon Globalists saw technocracy as a system they could use to control the population.

Essentially, an already-misguided vision of a future technocratic utopia was hijacked. Something bad was made much worse.

In a nutshell, this is the history of technocracy.

A locomotive is a society? No. That was the first fatally flawed idea. Everything that followed was increasingly bizarre.

Unfortunately, many people in our world believe in Globalism, if you could call a partial vague view a legitimate belief. They dreamily float on all the propaganda cover stories—greatest good for the greatest number of people; no more poverty; equality of sharing; reducing the carbon footprint; a green economy; “sustainable development”; international cooperation; engineering production and consumption of goods and services for the betterment of everyone; and all of this delivered from a central platform of altruistic guidance.

If you track down the specifics that sit under these cover stories, you discover a warped system of planning that expresses control over the global population.

The collective utopia turns out to be a sham.

Waking up is hard to do? Breaking up is hard to do? They must be done.

A workable technological fix is a very nice achievement when the project is a machine. But transferring that glow of victory to the whole of society is an illusion. Anything that calls itself education would tackle the illusion as the first order of business.

Engineering society requires engineering humans.

That is the fatal flaw.

It’s called mind control.

PART TWO

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Power of the states vs. power of the federal government: who cares? « Jon Rappoport’s Blog

By Jon Rappoport

There are 50 countries in the US. They’re called states.

All right, that’s an exaggeration. They are states. But they could be countries.

If you don’t think so, consider the 2015 state budget of tiny Rhode Island: $8.9 billion. The 2016 budget for the nation of Somalia was $216 million.

The 10th Amendment to the US Constitution reads: “The powers not delegated to the United States [government] by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.”

The 11th Amendment reads: “The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State, or by Citizens or Subjects of any Foreign State.”

If you combine these two Amendments, you begin to see the considerable powers granted to the states.

Of course, now, relatively few people care about these powers. They should, but they don’t. […]

Read the entire article at its Source: Power of the states vs. power of the federal government: who cares? « Jon Rappoport’s Blog