Finding Balance at the Spring Equinox: A Sun Ritual Using the Three Druid Elements

The Druid's Garden

The Spring Equinox, Alban Eiler, is the time when the light and the dark in the world are in balance. The timing of the Equinox is fortuitous–this time of balance–after such turmoil in the world. Here in the last two weeks here in the US, we’ve been on a whirlwind of change where nearly every person’s life has been radically disrupted and changed due to the global pandemic. Given the circumstances of where we are, today, I’d like to offer a balancing ritual for Spring Equinox that you can do personally to help bring balance into your life.  (I’m posting this a few days early from my usual weekly post so that you have it in time for the Equinox!)

Preliminaries

A representation of the 3 druid elements A representation of the 3 druid elements

This ritual uses the three druid elements: Gywar, Calas, and Nyfre, drawn from the druid revival for the ritual. These three terms…

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First Moon of Spring 2020

Soul Dreamers

By Phoenix the Elder –Greetings Dreamers, Artists, Healers and Lovers of the Moon, Spring is finally here! The birds sing, the clouds rumble and the flowers awaken. This first of three New Moons of Spring, starts March 24th, a few days before the Spring Equinox on March 19th. Watch your signs this week for the next cycle coming – as we settle into the changes happening around us, within us and in the world. For newbies, here are the directions of this work-study.

The global virus upon us, even if its not “the last of them or the final one”. This starts us off at the 3-year mark, past the Moontime Shift of August 21, 2017 Eclipse. That was the final death of the 3,000 year Sun Cult (time and the patriarch). Anyone who studies and works with cycles for a long time,  knows that the impacts of the…

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Food as Medicine: Black Elderberry (Sambucus nigra, Adoxaceae)

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Plants commonly known as elder belong to the genus Sambucus and consist of 20-30 species of deciduous trees and shrubs in the Adoxaceae, or moschatel, family.1-3 Sambucus species are native to forested temperate and subtropical climates and grow to an average height of 32 feet (10 m).1,3 Elder shrubs have light brown or gray stippled bark and narrow, dark green pinnately compound leaves with five to nine toothed leaflets.2,4 In early summer, elder plants produce flat to roundish clusters of tiny, cream-white, saucer-shaped flowers. Depending on the species, the clusters of small fruits, botanically characterized as drupes, are blue-black, black, or red (and rarely, yellow or white).2,3 The only elder species with a history of culinary use are those that produce blue-black or black fruits. Elder species are highly adaptable and readily naturalize in an area, making them potentially invasive outside their native range.3 This…

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