Food, Odds & Ends

Holiday Egg Dyeing with Herbs – Traditional Medicinals

Good Witches Homestead

As herbalists, we are naturally intrigued by all plants – for their historical use as traditional medicine, but also for art and creativity. We mark the passage of time with the growing and blooming of the plants we love, and with spring in our midst, we feel the natural urge to be more creative and to brighten up our homes. One such way is using plants as a natural dye. It’s a lovely activity for the Easter holiday, as traditionally eggs were decorated and hung on tree branches to symbolize the fertility of the spring season. It’s also a fun, anytime activity to do with children to celebrate spring!

MATERIALS & INGREDIENTS

Materials needed:

  • 5-10 containers, glass or plastic to use as vessels for plant dye
  • Small saucepan
  • Spoons
  • Cookie rack

Ingredients needed:

  • White Eggs: In order to get a clear sense of the dye colors, white eggs will be…

View original post 614 more words

Food, Plants, Wild Foodism

Dandelions with Bacon or Ham Recipe

A Hundred Years Ago

Each Spring a primordial urge pulls me out of the house –paring knife and bowl in hand– to the weedy natural area at the far edge of my yard. Luscious green dandelion plants peek through the brown leaf-covered grass. The winter has been long and hard, and I desperately need to renew myself. The tender foraged greens are my spring tonic (as they were for my parents and grandparents).

People traditionally ate a very limited selection of foods during the late winter months, and often they were nutrient-deprived by April. Their bodies told them they needed the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants provided by the emerging dandelion leaves.

Since I’m a dandelion connoisseur (Is it possible to be a connoisseur of weeds?) , I was thrilled to find a hundred-year-old recipe for Dandelion with Ham or Bacon.

I made the ham version. The ham bits nicely balanced the slight bitterness of…

View original post 76 more words

Food, Wild Foodism

Baked Eggs with Wild Garlic

Wylde and Green

This is a perfect Sunday morning breakfast, when you have the time to really sit down and enjoy it, and also the time to walk off the 1000 calories it is bound to have!

Spring is wild garlic season and this recipe really brings out the best of the flavor whilst still maintaining a delicacy. If you can’t get hold of any wild garlic the you can supplement for chard, and add chives and spring onions for the little kick.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 100g wild garlic, thick stalks removed and finely shredded
  • 5 tbsp double cream
  • ½ tsp dijon mustard
  • 100g gruyere, grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 sourdough bread, toasted, to serve

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Heat a knob of butter in a small, oven-proof frying pan and cook the chard with a splash of water, cook to wilt.
  2. Take the pan off the heat and stir…

View original post 41 more words

Food, Gardens, Plants

Native foods including rare strains of corn, beans and squash making a comeback

Life & Soul Magazine

Native foods – including rare strains of corn, beans, and squash – are being brought back from extinction thanks to the preservation and conservation efforts of indigenous tribes and a seed-lending library.

Members of the Potawatomi and Ojibwe tribes in Hopkins, Michigan have teamed up with the Jijak Foundation to help these rare strains of vegetables make a comeback. These vegetables are now being used in traditional ceremonies.

In Hopkins, Michigan, Native Americans of the Pottawatomi and Ojibwe tribes are bringing rare strains of vegetables back from the dead.

Farmers are receiving help from the Jijak Foundation, which describes itself as a “nonprofit organisation of the Gun Lake Band of Pottawatomi Indians dedicated to enriching our community through education, preservation, and perpetuation of our Tribe’s rich culture, arts, history, and living traditions”. The foundation’s seed-lending library is at the centre of the comeback story. Tribes around the Great Lakes region are…

View original post 209 more words

Food

3D Ocean Farming helping to restore the oceans and provide sustainable food

Life & Soul Magazine

Fishermen and scientists are working together to cultivate a sustainable solution to ocean food production, known as 3D Ocean Farming, which is designed to restore rather than deplete the oceans.

On Long Island in New York, locals have been tackling overfishing by using 3D Ocean Farming, which is a system that grows a mix of seaweed crops and shellfish – including mussels and oysters – under the water’s surface.

This polyculture vertical farming system requires zero input because the sea plants filter and sequester carbon, making it currently the most sustainable means of food production on the planet.

3D Ocean Farming also sequesters carbon and rebuilds the reef’s ecosystem. The crops and shellfish grown underwater can be used as food, fertiliser, animal feed and even energy. The food itself actually filters the water. In this way, climate change can be tackled while producing food.

One of the most well-known advocates…

View original post 453 more words

Food

Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake (with Rose)

Wylde and Green

This recipe is adapted from one I found in Lia Leendertz – The Almanac, A Seasonal Guide. A brilliant book for anyone interested in the seasonal tides, moons and fields.

The best thing about this cake….making it. I chose a gloomy, grey Sunday and the scent of the oranges lifted my spirits immeasurably. Blood oranges are in season from February to mid March I believe, so make this cake quick. I added rose water, because in my head this cake was so green and pink I wanted to add the delicate taste and fragrance of rose, and it really worked. This would be the perfect cake to bake for someone who needed some luck in love, or to raise the spirits after a broken heart.

img_7590Ingredients

  • 150g organic butter
  • 150g castor sugar
  • Zest of 3 blood oranges and juice of 1
  • 2 tsps of rose water
  • 2 free range eggs

View original post 185 more words

Food, Herbals

Foraging & Cooking with Ornamental Purple Plum Blossom: Spring Floral Confections — Gather Victoria

For me, the heady sweet almond-like fragrance of the Ornamental Purple Plum is the very essence of spring. Standing beneath their sensual pink and rose flower-laden branches on a sun-warmed afternoon is an absolutely swoon-worthy experience. Sadly underutilized as a culinary ingredient, plum blossom has a unique scent and flavour which infuses beautifully in cream,…

via Foraging & Cooking with Ornamental Purple Plum Blossom: Spring Floral Confections — Gather Victoria

Food, Plants

Svalbard Global Seed Vault: The “Noah’s Ark of Plant Diversity” protecting the world’s seed resources

Life & Soul Magazine

Svalbard Global Seed Vault, otherwise known as the “Noah’s Ark of Plant Diversity”, is home to what is quite possibly the world’s most important treasures – seeds.

Deep inside a mountain on a remote island in the Svalbard archipelago, halfway between mainland Norway and the North Pole, lies the Global Seed Vault. The Global Seed Vault isn’t just a large storage facility for seeds from around the world, but it is protecting the world’s agricultural genetic diversity and protecting future food supply in case of built to stand the test of time and the challenge of natural or man-made disasters.

The Svalbard archipelago, the furthest north reachable on a scheduled flight, was chosen for the vault’s location because it is remote, there are no volcanoes or earthquakes, and the permafrost keeps the seeds in deep-freeze. Svalbard Global Seed Vault’s remote location is 130 metres above sea level, and benefits from permafrost…

View original post 483 more words

Food, Gardens, Plants

The Bee Friendly Trust transforming station platforms into habitats for honeybees to thrive

Life & Soul Magazine

The Bee Friendly Trust is transforming railway station platforms and other neglected sites in the UK into forage-full habitats in which honey bees and other pollinators can thrive.

The Bee Friendly Trust works with railway authorities, volunteers and schools to provide a network of flowering habitats for honeybees. They build planters and create mini orchards on railway station platforms, solar farms and other land – filling the planters with bee-friendly flowers to form pollinator corridors across urban centres and beyond.

Honeybee numbers have been steadily declining in the UK, mainly due to habitat loss, climate change, toxic pesticides and disease. Yet without them, around a third of the food people eat wouldn’t exist.

The Bee Friendly Trust say: “We want to create a world where honeybees and other pollinators have the habitats they need in order to thrive, and in which individuals and communities feel inspired and empowered to nurture…

View original post 113 more words

Food, Gardens

Ryerson Urban Farm: Student-led rooftop farm creating opportunities to learn about growing food

Life & Soul Magazine

Students from Ryerson University in Toronto have converted a green roof on campus into an urban rooftop farm.

Ryerson Urban Farm began as a student initiative with the mission to grow food on campus and create opportunities for people to learn about growing food.

The urban farm aims to build capacity for rooftop farming through production, education and research. It also operates productive growing spaces across the Ryerson University campus using spray-free, ecological methods

The students sell the produce at a farmer’s market, to CSA (community supported agriculture) customers, and they give some to the campus food room, which is a place where students can have access to free food.

Ryerson Urban Farm is designed in the market garden tradition, with over 50 crops and more than 100 cultivars, along with three rooftop bee hives.

In addition to growing food on the rooftop, Ryerson Urban Farm also have a variety of…

View original post 99 more words