Bird Folklore of Healing and Death

Little Red Riding Hood

secretsoftheserpent

Everyone has heard the story Little Red Riding Hood, but no one knows what symbolism is trying to say.  Everyone tries to say it has to do with natural cycles, puberty rites, erotic or romantic, and I have even seen where people say it has to do with rape.  All wrong.  Little Red Riding Hood came from Little Red Cap and it was a folklore, which means it was told verbally for thousands of years.  As a story told verbally it probably did have to do with the culture and traditions of the people who were telling it.  Once it was written down by Charles Perrault it had a whole new meaning.  This is why the Brothers Grimm had to write a version too.  

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Native American Herbs of the Northeast

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

A look to the past reveals some of the most important plants used by Eastern woodland tribes – and an inestimable connection to nature.

My adventure into the historical uses of many Native American plants began when Maine native Kerry Hardy, author of Notes on a Lost Flute: A Field Guide to the Wabanaki, presented a program for Western Maine’s Greater Lovell Land Trust, billed as “Native American Plant Medicine” last summer. So many plants and so many uses! I was intrigued to find out more about these plants and explore the wealth of medicinal knowledge from Eastern Woodlands tribes like the Mohawk, Wyandot {Huron}, and Iroquois. From Hardy’s work, as well as from the research of author Charlotte Erichsen-Brown, I enjoyed a glimpse into how these tribes looked to nature for healing – and how early pioneers benefited from their knowledge.

elderberries-af-canyon-3-2013-09-05

The Essential Elderberry

Hardy’s book focuses on…

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A Druid’s Guide to Connecting With Nature, Part III: Nature Engagement

The Druid's Garden

Leading you in deeper! Leading you in deeper!

I’ve heard a lot of conversation in the nature spirituality community, including the druid community, about not touching nature, leaving it alone, to simply “be”.  I remember one influential druid speaking at an event and saying, “The best thing you can do in nature is pick up the garbage and get out.”  From a certain standpoint, this perspective makes a lot of sense. It is the same perspective held by many conservationists trying to preserve pristine lands or lands that have been replanted and are healing; the best thing that can be done is figure out how to keep people from mucking them up, pick up garbage, and leave them undisturbed. Because people have a tendency to come in, move things about, pick things, disrupt ecosystems, and generally cause havoc.  Or worse, much, much worse. Further, in a world where most humans can’t identify even five…

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Regional traditional folk symbolism of Lublin, Poland

Elder Mountain’s Folk Smudge – Autumn 2018

Elder Mountain’s Folk Smudge …

The Enchanter’s Daughter

The Enchanter’s Daughter …

Snail Totem, Black Snail and Folklore

By Elder Mountain Dreaming

Protection of houses against evil in the region of Mazovia

by Elder Mountain Dreaming

Spellbinding Sweet Woodruff Cake: Prosperity Magic — gather

In my tiny wildish garden, nestling at the foot of a tall tree, is sweet woodruff. Her glossy leaves and small white blossoms may be hidden by a profusion of taller plants, but it is her scent that perfumes the air. Fresh, her fragrance (like rain, earth, fresh air and green grass all condensed into…

via Spellbinding Sweet Woodruff Cake: Prosperity Magic — gather