Ozark Encyclopedia – N – Needles

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Held in mouth while cutting onions – “A girl from Cape Fair, Missouri, once told me that a woman can peel or cut up raw onions without making her eyes smart, simply by holding a needle in her mouth while she does the job.” ~Randolph OMF 138-139

Held in mouth for sore eyes – “…in other backwoods towns I have heard that a needle in the mouth is generally believed to be good for sore or watery eyes, no matter what the cause of the irritation.” ~Randolph OMF 139

Needle used in making a love charm – “A girl can take a needle which has been stuck into a dead body, cover it with dirt in which a corpse has been laid, and wrap the whole thing in a cloth cut from a winding sheet; this is supposed to be a very powerful love charm, and a woman who owns…

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Sage Ash

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Witchery Wednesday

One of the signs that you might be a little witchy is that you tend to save everything.  It’s not hoarding if it’s useful, right?  And when it comes to spellwork, everything can be useful.  If your pockets are currently full of bits of stray string and your shelves full of glass jars (that may or may not actually contain cobwebs on purpose) then you know what we’re talking about.  But here’s something you’re probably not saving that you should be.

Burning white sage, whether as a smudge stick or loose, is almost a witchy right of passage.  Some people will insist that you should discard of any loose sage or sage ash that is “used up” after burning so as to avoid “contamination”.  But we disagree.  Sage ash is incredibly useful, and should not be wasted.

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How to do it?  If you are using a smudge stick, roll…

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The Primal Cave of a Wild Woodsy Witch — Salts – Magikal Properties

~ March Magick ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

Activities and Rituals: consecration of tools, earth blessings, grounding work, planting/sowing, rejuvenation spells, spring cleaning

Animals:  chicks, hares, lambs, rabbits

Birds: swallows

Colors: dark green, light pastel colors

Deities: Artemis, Astarte, Hecate, Isis, The Morrigan

Flowers: crocus, daffodil, honeysuckle, iris, lilly […]

Read the entire post at the Source: ~ March Magick ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

~ Saint Magick – Saint Brigid of Kildare ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

saint-brigid

FEAST DAY: February 1

DAY OF THE WEEK: Sunday

CANDLE COLOR: Yellow

LEGEND: Daughter of Dubtach, pagan Scottish king of Leinster, and Brocca, a Christian Pictish slave who had been baptized by Saint Patrick. Just before Brigid’s birth, her mother was sold to a Druid landowner. Brigid remained with her mother till she was old enough to serve her legal owner Dubtach, her father.

She grew up marked by her high spirits and tender heart, and as a child, she heard Saint Patrick preach, which she never forgot. She could not bear to see anyone hungry or cold, and to help them, often gave away things that were Dubtach’s. When Dubtach protested, she replied that “Christ dwelt in every creature”. Dubtach tried to sell her to the King of Leinster, and while they bargained, she gave a treasured sword of her father’s to a leper. Dubtach was about to strike her when Brigid explained she had given the sword to God through the leper, because of its great value. The King, a Christian, forbade Dubtach to strike her, saying “Her merit before God is greater than ours”. Dubtach solved this domestic problem by giving Brigid her freedom.

Brigid’s aged mother was in charge of her master’s dairy. Brigid took charge ,and often gave away the produce. But the dairy prospered under her (hence her patronage of milk maids, dairy workers, cattle, etc.), and the Druid freed Brigid’s mother.

Brigid returned to her father, who arranged a marriage for her with a young bard. Bride refused, and to keep her virginity, went to Bishop Mel, a pupil of Saint Patrick’s, and took her first vows. Legend says that she prayed that her beauty be taken from her so no one would seek her hand in marriage; her prayer was granted, and she regained her beauty only after making her vows. Another tale says that when Saint Patrick heard her final vows, he mistakenly used the form for ordaining priests. When told of it he replied, “So be it, my son, she is destined for great things.”

Her first convent started with seven nuns. At the invitation of bishops, she started convents all over Ireland. She was a great traveller, especially considering the conditions of the time, which led to her patronage of travellers, sailors, etc. Brigid invented the double monastery, the monastery of Kildare that she ran on the Liffey river being for both monks and nuns. Saint Conleth became its first bishop; this connection and the installation of a bell that lasted over 1000 years apparently led to her patronage of blacksmiths and those in related fields.

PETITION SAINT BRIGED: for childbirth, protection from fires, fertility, the hearth, healing, physcians, agriculture, animal husbandry, inspiriation, learning, poetry, prophecy, smithcraft, love.

PATRONAGE: babies; blacksmiths; boatmen; cattle; chicken farmers; children whose parents are not married; dairymaids; dairy workers; fugitives; infants; Ireland; Leinster, Ireland; mariners; midwives; milk maids; newborn babies; nuns; poets; poultry farmers; poultry raisers; printing presses; sailors; scholars; travellers; watermen

REPRESENTATION: abbess, usually holding a lamp or candle, often with a cow nearby

Source: ~ Saint Magick – Saint Brigid of Kildare ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

Four Thieves Vinegar – Good Witches Homestead

From what evidence we have, infused vinegar have existed almost since we first discovered vinegar. It’s so useful by itself, and infusing it increases its effectiveness and potency. Its many functions include:

– culinary
– preservation
– beauty regimes
– cleansing
– disinfection
– anti-infestation

Herb-infused vinegar is natural, organic, non-toxic, inexpensive, traditional technology that used to and still can replace so many of our modern products. They can be full strength for cleaning and disinfect, as an insect discouragement or anti-fungal. With the proper ingredients, they are remarkably effective against bacteria, as well as an efficient cleanser, which leaves a refreshing scent. I personally have used the diluted spray to cure my apple trees of a debilitating fungus that had been plaguing them for years. I also got rid of the aphids on my Virginia Creeper and created a scent barrier against ants getting into my house.

Diluted, often with rosewater, it was used as a cosmetic, to tone the face, clear up eruptions, refresh clothing, and in a sponge nosegay, was kept near the face to ward off the Plague. Certain physicians are still called quacks due to the medieval practice of wearing a duck-like mask with a sponge of aromatic vinegar resting in the beak when visiting areas of contagion. Perhaps it’s currently an insult to call a doctor a quack because it implies their techniques are right out of the Middle Ages.

*It should be used only with extreme caution during pregnancy, * as some of the herbs are abortifacient. I used it when I was pregnant with my son to no ill effects, but I took care not to get any on my skin.

Four Thieves Oil is a very modern invention, and not the same thing at all. It usually contains essential oils of similar herbs, but oils and aqueous infusions do not often share the same properties. It cannot be used for all the same purposes as the vinegar formulations, and are often far more expensive. Though it apparently can be used for similar magical purposes, such as banishment, in Vodun and other systems…

The first actual record we have for the version known as Four Thieves is not medieval. If it is indeed an actual record. Most of the “documentation” is really stories. I will take the liberty to re-post this excellent history. (I’d credit it if I knew the original source, but this exact version is all over the ‘net.) :

“The famous French aromatherapy doctor, Jean Valnet, has two recipes in his book. He claims corpse robbers who were caught red-handed in the area around Toulouse in 1628-1631 revealed the original recipe. His story is the more credible of the many ones can find. Given the virulence and deadliness of the plague, the judges were astonished by the indifference of the thieves to contagion. Valnet quotes the archives of the Parliament of Toulouse:

“During the Great Plague, four robbers were convicted of going to the houses of plague victims, strangling them in their beds and then looting their dwellings. For this, they were condemned to be burned at the stake, and in order to have their sentence mitigated, they revealed their secret preservative, after which they were hanged.”

Here’s one of the versions stated to be original.

Four Thieves Formula

3 pints white wine vinegar
handful wormwood
handful meadowsweet
handful juniper berries
handful wild marjoram
handful sage
50 cloves
2 oz. elecampane root
2 oz. angelica
2 oz. rosemary
2 oz. horehound
3 g camphor

Dr. Valnet has a variation of his own described as an antiseptic vinegar.

Marseilles Vinegar

40 g. greater wormwood, Artemesia absinthium
40 g. lesser wormwood, Artemesia pontica
40 g. rosemary
40 g. sage
40 g. mint
40 g. rue
40 g. lavender
5 g. calamus
5 g. cinnamon
5 g. clove
5 g. nutmeg
5 g. garlic
10 g. camphor (not synthetic camphor)
40 g. crystallized acetic acid
2500 g. white vinegar

Instructions: steep the plants in the vinegar for 10 days. Force through a sieve. Add the camphor dissolved in the acetic acid; filter.

Years of experimentation using historical and modern recipes have helped create my interpretation of this legendary liquid. My version is an amalgam of several different recipes, taking into account what was commonly available, especially in England, during the medieval period, and what was in my garden fresh. It is a concoction of white wine vinegar steeped in aromatic and antibacterial herbs such as garlic, rue, and wormwood for a number of days, then filtered and used for dilution with water for cleansing the house and other areas.

Remember: Only use real, brewed vinegar for all infused vinegar recipes. Ordinary store-bought white vinegar is just lab-created Acetic Acid diluted to 5%. It doesn’t have the same richness of composition or balance of acids as real brewed vinegar or the same sustainability. Try these recipes with other base vinegar, too, such as apple cider and rice wine!

Here is my exact recipe, for those that want to try it at home.

My Four Thieves Vinegar Recipe:

Approximately the same sized twig piece of each:

fresh peppermint
fresh thyme
fresh rue
fresh rosemary
fresh wormwood
fresh sage
four cloves garlic (slightly crushed to release the allicin)
3 bay leaves
4 cloves
4 small pieces cinnamon bark

Place ingredients in old, clean, spaghetti jar. Fill remainder of jar with white wine vinegar, stir to get rid of bubbles. Add lid, and place in sunlight, like windowsill. Herbs will lose color after a few days. Then you filter and can add a bit more herbs for a really strong batch.

Filter out completely in a few weeks; bottle and label.

Source: Four Thieves Vinegar – Good Witches Homestead

Top 10 Conjure Hacks For 2017 …

Creole Moon Publications, Spiritual Supplies and Magickal Apothecary

Source: Creole Moon Publications, Spiritual Supplies and Magickal Apothecary

~ The Magical Use Of Cascarilla ~

While cascarilla is not something you would find among the many supplies of a Wiccan or occult practioner, cascarilla is an important ingredient found among the practioners of Curanderismo, Espiritismo, hoodoo, Palo, Santeria and Vodou as a well known source of protection, tool of invocation, purifications and cleansings. …

Read article in entirety at Source: ~ The Magical Use Of Cascarilla ~

~ The Use Of Occult Oils ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

The use of Occult Oils have been a part of all various types of magickal practices for thousands of years.  Hoodoo Rootworkers traditionally name their oil compounds for the conditions they are believed to cause or cure.  Oils are used in numerous ways while most often they are rubbed on candles which are then burned in ritual, they are also used to anoint charms, mojo-bags, doorways and window sills of a home or business and can also be added to bath water

Read the rest at Source: ~ The Use Of Occult Oils ~ – Ye Olde Dark Arts

Psalms For …

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Psalms 1: For removal of the ungodly from a group; for a safe pregnancy.
Psalms 2: To aid in disbanding and breaking up enemy conspiracies.
Psalms 3: For relief from a severe headache or from back pain.
Psalms 4: For restful and peaceful sleep; to change one’s luck from bad to good.
Psalms 5: For finding favor with authorities or superiors in business.
Psalms 6: For healing diseases of the eye; for protection in the dark.
Psalms 7: To stop conspiracies, enemy pursuit, for court cases.
Psalms 8: Business success through the good will of associates; blessing of oils.
Psalms 9: To punish enemies; to restore health to male children; for court cases.
Psalms 10: To cleanse off an unclean, restless, or intranquil spirit.

Read The Rest Of Psalms At Omo Ache …