Law

People thought we were conspiracy nuts when we said these things.

secretsoftheserpent

People do not understand law.  I am all for having law and order.  This defund the police movement the past couple years is all from ignorance.  What we really need is people to understand law.  If you understand how the law actually works it can help you and protect you. When I first took a law class, this was in bold print on the board when I walked in ”Ignorance of the Law is no excuse”.    If you really wanted to make changes in this world then we would need to defund the politicians.  


View original post 2,376 more words

The Deadliest Plant In North America

In 1992, a 23-year-old man and his 39-year-old brother were foraging for wild ginseng in Maine.  The younger brother harvested several plants from a swampy area and took three bites from the root of one plant.  The older brother took one bite from the same root.

Within three hours, the younger brother died.  The older brother lived, though not without experiencing seizures and delirium.

The offending plant, of course, was not wild ginseng.  It was water hemlock (Cicuta maculata). 

Water hemlock is considered the most toxic plant in North America.  Some sources even consider water hemlock to be the most toxic plant in the Northern Hemisphere.

As it turns out, water hemlock is not a single species.  Water hemlock represents multiple species that all contain a potent toxin.  This toxin disrupts the central nervous system and can lead to death if prompt treatment isn’t given.

I recently spent some time in the presence of two water hemlock species.  If you’re interested in learning how to identify these deadly plants, check out the new video!

Thanks for reading and watching, and thank you for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan

Foraging The Elusive Mayapple

Tropical fruit flavors are not commonly detected in my neck of the woods.  When they are, the experience is unforgettable.

Mayapple (Podophyllum peltatum) is an eastern North American plant whose ripe fruit tastes like a mix between pineapple and Starburst candy.  All other parts of the plant (e.g., rhizomes, leaves, stems, and unripe fruits) are considered toxic.

My first encounter with a ripe mayapple fruit was unforgettable.  I actually smelled the fruit before I saw it.  Within seconds of harvesting, I indulged in what little edible material was available.  The taste was ambrosial — almost too good to be true — and from that day forward I became a devout seeker of ripe mayapple fruits.

As it turns out, conditions this year have been very good for mayapple fruits.  Foragers in many locations have been reporting bountiful harvests.  Because conditions have been fruitful, I decided to film a video in which I discuss key tips for improving your yield. 

If you are interested in becoming a devout seeker of ripe mayapple fruits, check out the video!

Foraging Wild Mushrooms is an online course that is currently open for enrollment until September 2nd.  This go-at-your-own-pace video course is perfect for beginners who are looking to develop their skills.  If you are eager to harvest wild mushrooms but don’t know where to start or where to go, Foraging Wild Mushrooms will equip you with the necessary skills to ensure that your harvests are safe and rewarding.  You can learn more by clicking this link.

Thanks for reading and watching, and thank you for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan

Mind Driven

secretsoftheserpent

To understand humans you must understand the mind.  Humans are mind driven.  Everything that they do arises from their own thoughts.  They develop opinions, ideologies and beliefs that become the dominate forces in their personality.  Yet most have no understanding as to what the mind really is or understand how to use it.  People think the mind is a great computer.  That they can program and educate it and they will be successful.  This post will show you that this is not the case.  The human mind is not good. It was a mind created from an evil act.  The human mind is immoral at best.  

View original post 4,227 more words

Get Out of Your Own Way

secretsoftheserpent

We think failure is scary. We all want to succeed. We want things to go our way. What you don’t realize is succeeding is scarier than failing. Why? Because failure is familiar. You are used to it. Deep down inside, when it comes to trauma, you do not care if it sucks or not. All your DNA cares about is “Is this known?” Every human secretly gets what they are used to. This is why self sabotage kicks in when you have a certain amount of success. We all have that ceiling that if we pass it we will self sabotage. We are not scared of failure, we are scared of succeeding.


View original post 3,859 more words

Is This Invasive Plant Killing Wetlands?

Menace.  Monster.  Barbarian.  Scourge.  Thug.  Outlaw.  Killer.

All these terms have been used in one publication or another to describe a single species whose common name is a bit less provocative.

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).

This showy plant was introduced to North America from Europe in the early 1800s.  Since then, purple loosestrife has spread itself far and wide across the North American continent.

Today, purple loosestrife is considered a noxious weed throughout many parts of North America.  The International Union for Conservation of Nature even lists purple loosestrife as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species in the world.

But not everyone agrees that this “purple menace” is a serious threat. 

Some researchers think that the problems associated with purple loosestrife invasion are exaggerated.  Some researchers even think that purple loosestrife invasion is associated with positive effects in North America.

Who are we to believe?  How can people be so divided over a single plant?  What does the research really say?  Is purple loosestrife a serious ecological threat or not? 

We explore the topic of purple loosestrife invasion in a brand new video.  If you are interested in learning more about this purported wetland killer, check it out!

Thanks for reading and watching, and thanks for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan

Foraging Wineberries — Delicious Wild Edible Fruits

What would summer be without a trip to the local berry patch?

In my neck of the woods and fields, it wouldn’t be summer at all.

Some of nature’s tastiest fruits — black raspberries, red raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries — ripen during the warmest days of the year.  A perfectly timed visit to a prime location can yield a berry bonanza.

One such prime location includes sunny openings within rich woods.  It is here where a particular kind of raspberry grows.  Known as wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius), this semi-recent newcomer to the North American continent produces delicious edible fruits that taste like tangy red raspberries.

During my latest visit to a local wineberry patch, I filmed a video in which I discuss the factors that contribute to the success of wineberry in North America, as well as tips for locating wild populations.

If you are interested in harvesting wineberries this year, check out the brand new video!

I was a recent guest on the WildFed Podcast hosted by Daniel Vitalis.  In this conversation, we chat about my favorite topic as of late:  trees.  You can listen to the interview through one of the following links:

Thanks for reading and watching, and thanks for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan

Wild Chamomile (Pineapple Weed) Keto Muffins w/ Cream Cheese Filling — Gather Victoria

OH, MY GODDESS – you’ve got to make these Wild Chamomile/ Pineapple Weed muffins! Their unique aromatic flavor ( a cross between zingy pineapple and soothing chamomile) just permeates these moist fragrant muffins which are made doubly scrumptious by the cream cheese filling. These are one of my favorite summer treats and my poor pre-diabetic…

Wild Chamomile (Pineapple Weed) Keto Muffins w/ Cream Cheese Filling — Gather Victoria

How to Understand Media

secretsoftheserpent

Life used to be about our own private lives.  Today world affairs have made their way into everyones life.  For the most part this has been difficult for us.  Most people are intelligent and have good intentions, but they are not trained in international affairs.  The average person knows nothing about governments or politics.   Even though we go to the polls to vote for someone we think will represent us, we know nothing about the candidates or their policies.  People judge candidates by seeing them on the internet and television.  Everything about these candidates is bias to what they think you will want to hear.  Yet this is the way everyone makes their decisions.  We like people, we believe in people, we are gullible, but we want someone who thinks like we do to run the world. This type of thinking has gone stale.   We don’t live in…

View original post 5,092 more words

How To Find Pawpaws In The Wild

Good food is bestowed upon those who scout.

This is especially true when we consider what it takes to harvest pawpaws.

Pawpaws are incredibly delicious fruits that are produced by pawpaw trees (Asimina triloba).  Green and kidney-shaped, these tropical-tasting berries are considered to be the largest edible fruits produced by any native North American tree.

Many people are interested in finding pawpaws for the first time this year.  Some people will wait until the fruits are ripe in September to begin their search.

I would suggest another approach:  begin your search right now. 

Scouting the land in advance is an essential part of harvesting wild food.  When preparatory work has been done ahead of time, successful harvests are much more likely to occur.  Such is the case when we understand what it takes to find pawpaws.

What does preparatory work look like?  How do we begin our search for pawpaws?  What kinds of habitats are worth exploring?

I answer all those questions in a brand new video.  If you are interested in harvesting pawpaws this year, check it out!

I was a recent guest on the Silvercore Podcast hosted by Travis Bader.  In this conversation, we chat about foraging, the importance of learning trees, and why money is necessary to protect land.  You can listen to the interview here.

Click to listen

Thanks for reading and watching, and thanks for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan