Thor’s Hammer

Elder Mountain Dreaming

By Phoenix of Elder Mountain Dreaming – Thor’s Hammer is called Mjolnir (pronounced ‘miol-neer’) and is perhaps one of the best known Norse mythology symbols. In astrology the symbolism also matches the Nordic meanings, but has more to do with where we struggle and where fate does not change that struggle, even if you overcome its challenges.

I had found the asteroid Charis (asteroid #627), which is the name of the Greek Goddess surrounded by delight, graces and pleasures; Aglaia, Euphrosyne and Thalia who were the three Charities of charm and grace. In a natal chart, Charis by house and sign indicates where and how you can experience and enjoy good luck, joy and delight. If afflicted by inharmonious aspects, then she shows the opposite.

Of course, mine is the opposite and afflicted, and she is part of my Thor’s Hammer. She is conjunct my Mars/Saturn by 1 degree…

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Plastic Waste into Resources: Exploring Ecobricks as Sustainable Building Tools

The Druid's Garden

As I described in last week’s post, at least here in the US, we have serious challenges befalling us with plastic recycling along with a host of waste plastics that can never be recycled. A recycling infrastructure built almost exclusively on exporting masses of “dirty” recycling to China now has the recycling system here in the US is in shambles when China stopped taking recycling. Further, so many plastics simply can’t be recycled, meaning that even well meaning folks who recycle everything they can still end up throwing away enormous amounts of single-use plastics, packaging, film, and other waste. In permaculture design terms, it is time to turn some of this waste into a resource!  So in today’s post, I’d like to explore the concept of making ecobricks as a way to sink large amounts of un-recyclable waste into a productive resource and share some designs and…

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Native American Truth

secretsoftheserpent

We are taught that the Native Americans were hunter gathers, savages who sacrificed children, that they were illiterate and  uncultured.  This is the furthest thing from the truth.  The Bering Strait theory that Natives walked across from Siberia to Alaska was thought up in 1964 and the theory came unglued in 1997.  Findings in southern Chile made archeologists publicly concede they were wrong.  Yet this theory is still taught and forced down our throats.  Archeologist Stuart Fiedel even stated. “Everything we knew is now supposed to be wrong.  We’re in a state of turmoil”.  The only reason why the Bering Strait and human origin stories are the way they are is because it keeps the lies of the Bible intact.  So much for science and religion being separate.  

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Wild Cakes for Camossung: A Prayer For Restoring The Garden — Gather Victoria

My family background is pretty diverse (stretching across Europe, from Spain, France, Greece to Eastern Europe and Russia) so I harvest and write about the many foods my ancestors have eaten for literally thousands of years. But I also resonate deeply with the food cultures of the Coast Salish Peoples whose territories I occupy. I…

via Wild Cakes for Camossung: A Prayer For Restoring The Garden — Gather Victoria

The Best Places to Purchase Herbs and Supplies World-Wide

Good Witches Homestead

Please keep in mind that the vendors shared here are not endorsed by the Herbal Academy. We have reviewed these suppliers to the best of our ability, but as we mentioned earlier, we recommend that you do your own research to determine if the supplier you are considering ordering from is a good fit for your needs!

We’ve pulled together some of the best places to purchase herbs and supplies world-wide to make it easier to find what you need for your herbal studies!

Source: The Best Places to Purchase Herbs and Supplies World-Wide

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Dreaming Mirrors

Elder Mountain Dreaming

Compilation and additions by Phoenix of Elder Mountain Dreaming – My intention with this article is not magic, but to inspire being conscious when it comes to rituals, practices and dreaming, especially if these are natural gifts for you. Since we all have past life karma, the complexities of dreaming or those applied to waking dreams (signs, synchronicity and mirrors of self) always needs protection and we need to see a reflection in life or dreaming images in order to “mirror back” what is unseen so we can navigate our journey betters.

Somethings we can protect ourselves from by practices and healing work, disciplines and even sobriety to live a healthier life, but other things we cannot control nor undo fate or the power of life, death and rebirth.

Magic is always associated with mirrors, but so is buddhism. There is a dark and a light side to the reflections of one’s life and by…

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A Deeper Look At Forest Roots

Black and Blue Cohosh Forest

Sandy loam, a substance created by the breakdown of minerals (rock) mixed with the breakdown of carbon (tree or grass detritus). Sandy loam is what we all want, because it is the best all around substrate for growing the plants we love the most: GoldensealGinsengBlack and Blue CohoshWild YamTwinleafBloodroot, Stonerooot, Mayapple — the entire interconnected clan of powerfully medicinal shade-loving forest roots. My book “Growing At-Risk” gives a chapter on each of these (and other) herbs of the hardwood forest biome. Let’s look a bit deeper into what can be done to bring these entities down home and help them prosper!

Survey the growing area. It may be a woodland with trees, brush and diverse broadleaf species already intact. If this is the case, identify areas overgrown by weedy species or heavily shaded by dead wood or thin-able trees. Such areas have often been left undisturbed for some time, and the soil may be rich and undisturbed. Clear away dead wood and crowded trees, giving access to the forest floor and providing more light to the growing beds. Forest roots like dappled shade, where sunlight moves across the moist and humus-laden soil in amorphous patches.

After all, even shade-loving herbs eat light! Remove existing weedy species and push your spade into the ground. If you have at least 6 inches of good dirt, then it’s a go. Pull the existing mulch away from the planting bed, which should be at

Mayapple Forest

least 4 feet wide, arranged with a path to the side to guide forest creatures and humans away from the planting, not over the top of the sensitive plants. Pile the mulch in the path, and plant the dormant roots in the bed, then rake the mulch back over the top of the bed. Mark the bed with a heavy stake and a label giving the date and the species planted there. Metal tags may be used for this, so that they do not fade or disintegrate with time. You will be oh-so-happy that you marked your planting spot!

 

Read full article via Ricoh’s Blog: A Deeper Look at Forest Roots

Fall Gourds

Good Witches Homestead

Storage containers, bowls, utensils, tools, masks, musical instruments, jewelry, dolls, flotation devices, toys, wheels, sieves, food, birdhouses – the list goes on and on for the many functional, spiritual, and decorative uses of the humble gourd. At this time of year, gourds abound at farmer’s markets, the grocery store, and even the backyard for some dedicated growers. This oddly shaped fruit has a colorful history – and deserves a bit of spotlight.

Origin

While not a common backyard plant today, it’s believed that gourds may be the earliest domesticated plant in North America. A previous theory held that the bottle gourd originated in Africa, carried over to the Americas via the Atlantic Ocean. But as the American Gourd Society reports, archeological and DNA evidence shows them coming from Asia more than 10,000 years ago via the Bering Strait – either by boat, by floating across the water, or carried by…

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A Tribute To The Dog — Oro Cas Reflects

20180829_083939_HDR(1)I found the following piece of literature in a 1959 National Geographic magazine that I own. It is part of a huge collection that I purchased from an estate. This writing can also be found inscribed on “The Old Drum Memorial” in Warrensburg Missouri and was written in 1870. A Tribute To The Dog A […]

via A Tribute To The Dog — Oro Cas Reflects

August (and Blackberry Jam)

Wylde and Green

Isn’t August the strangest of months? One day you are in the middle of summer and then the next the edges of the Autumn are creeping all around. It is a wonderfully golden month…so full of life with fruit and vegetables ripening on every branch and the fields still blazing in the late summer sunshine.

Nature has shifted from growth to ripening, and everything feels ‘full’.

If you look at the trees, you can just see the little hints of gold creeping in, it is a beautiful month, but it reminds us that we cannot keep the summer, or indeed the fruits ripe on the trees – I love the below Seamus Heaney Poem. It’s perfect for August.

What we can keep though, is as much of Augusts harvests as we are able. So, here is a simple recipe for Blackberry Jam and a hope you find the time to…

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