Herbs for Your Windowsill

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Like the idea of growing your own medicinal plants? Look no further than your windowsill or patio garden for these four standbys of ours: lemon balm, sage thyme, and peppermint. These herbs are familiar to us from grandma’s recipes and as lyrics in songs, but they may be less familiar as medicine. Lemon balm, also known as “hearts delight” and the “gladdening” herb, has long been treasured for its ability to soothe the nerves and uplift the spirit. An old Arabian proverb says that “balm makes the heart merry and joyful.” From ancient times, though, sage was used for digestive troubles, heartburn, depression, and even dementia. Thyme is excellent for treating sore throats and bronchitis. Make thyme tea with honey to soothe those colds and coughs. And women listen up, for bloating and digestive issues associated with our monthly cycle thyme is an excellent soother and diuretic. Another great herb for digestion…

View original post 305 more words

Old-fashioned Banana Fritters

A Hundred Years Ago

Banana Fritters are a wonderful comfort food, so I was thrilled to find a hundred-year-old recipe for them. The fritters were crispy; and, when served with a little confectioners sugar sprinkled on top, had just the right amount of sweetness. The fritters are made using banana slices or chunks, and when I bit into them, the embedded fruit was pure delight. This recipe is a keeper.

Here’s the original recipe:

Source: American Cookery (March, 1919)

And, here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

View original post

Dandelions with Bacon or Ham Recipe

A Hundred Years Ago

Each Spring a primordial urge pulls me out of the house –paring knife and bowl in hand– to the weedy natural area at the far edge of my yard. Luscious green dandelion plants peek through the brown leaf-covered grass. The winter has been long and hard, and I desperately need to renew myself. The tender foraged greens are my spring tonic (as they were for my parents and grandparents).

People traditionally ate a very limited selection of foods during the late winter months, and often they were nutrient-deprived by April. Their bodies told them they needed the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants provided by the emerging dandelion leaves.

Since I’m a dandelion connoisseur (Is it possible to be a connoisseur of weeds?) , I was thrilled to find a hundred-year-old recipe for Dandelion with Ham or Bacon.

I made the ham version. The ham bits nicely balanced the slight bitterness of…

View original post 76 more words

Baked Eggs with Wild Garlic

Wylde and Green

This is a perfect Sunday morning breakfast, when you have the time to really sit down and enjoy it, and also the time to walk off the 1000 calories it is bound to have!

Spring is wild garlic season and this recipe really brings out the best of the flavor whilst still maintaining a delicacy. If you can’t get hold of any wild garlic the you can supplement for chard, and add chives and spring onions for the little kick.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 100g wild garlic, thick stalks removed and finely shredded
  • 5 tbsp double cream
  • ½ tsp dijon mustard
  • 100g gruyere, grated
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 sourdough bread, toasted, to serve

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 200°C/180°C fan/gas 6. Heat a knob of butter in a small, oven-proof frying pan and cook the chard with a splash of water, cook to wilt.
  2. Take the pan off the heat and stir…

View original post 41 more words

Aromatic Herb for March; Spring Herb: Cicely {Myrrhis odorata}

Good Witches Homestead

Also, Known As:

  • Anise Fern
  • British Myrrh
  • Cicely
  • Cow Chervil
  • Garden Myrrh
  • Shepherd’s Needle
  • Smooth Cicely
  • Sweet Bracken
  • Sweet Chervil
  • Sweet Cicely
  • Sweet Myrrh

The plant called the sweet cicely is a hardy and robust herb. The cicely is an aromatic perennial herb indigenous to the mountainous areas of Europe and Asian Russia – growing originally only in these regions. The cicely when fully mature can reach 0.6 to 0.9 m or 2 to 3 feet in height. Sweet cicely is one of the first herbs that come up when spring arrives; the sweet cicely is a pretty plant and makes a beautiful backdrop to a perennial border in mountainous regions where it grows.

In older times, people would usually grow this old cottage garden perennial at a site near the door to the kitchen. The site would be chosen so that the pretty divided fern-like leaves could be easily…

View original post 1,473 more words

Blood Orange and Pistachio Cake (with Rose)

Wylde and Green

This recipe is adapted from one I found in Lia Leendertz – The Almanac, A Seasonal Guide. A brilliant book for anyone interested in the seasonal tides, moons and fields.

The best thing about this cake….making it. I chose a gloomy, grey Sunday and the scent of the oranges lifted my spirits immeasurably. Blood oranges are in season from February to mid March I believe, so make this cake quick. I added rose water, because in my head this cake was so green and pink I wanted to add the delicate taste and fragrance of rose, and it really worked. This would be the perfect cake to bake for someone who needed some luck in love, or to raise the spirits after a broken heart.

img_7590Ingredients

  • 150g organic butter
  • 150g castor sugar
  • Zest of 3 blood oranges and juice of 1
  • 2 tsps of rose water
  • 2 free range eggs

View original post 185 more words

Foraging & Cooking with Ornamental Purple Plum Blossom: Spring Floral Confections — Gather Victoria

For me, the heady sweet almond-like fragrance of the Ornamental Purple Plum is the very essence of spring. Standing beneath their sensual pink and rose flower-laden branches on a sun-warmed afternoon is an absolutely swoon-worthy experience. Sadly underutilized as a culinary ingredient, plum blossom has a unique scent and flavour which infuses beautifully in cream,…

via Foraging & Cooking with Ornamental Purple Plum Blossom: Spring Floral Confections — Gather Victoria

Manzanita Tree Medicine

I love this tree. It’s an all purpose tree with beautiful wood for woodworking and fragrant in campfires and bar-b-ques.

Elder Mountain Dreaming

Arctostaphylos Manzanita is in the family of the Ericaceae. Various names are Greenleaf manzanita; Big berry plant (Navajo); Big Manzanita, Mariposa Manzanita, Whiteleaf Manzanita; Madroño Borracho, Pinguica. They grow along in California, Nevada and Oregon up to the west slopes of the Sierras into the Great Basin and Rocky Mountains. In some areas they are large trees and some are like shrubs, all have a beautiful smooth, matte-finished red bark and a light to medium sage colored evergreen leaves.

Leaves are smooth, wide, dull green and thick as leather. The flowers bloom in little nodding clusters and are pinkish and urn shaped, maturing into red, tart, mealy berries with from 4-10 seeds. It is hardy to zone 8 and has green leaves all year. Flowers from late February to April. The flowers are hermaphrodite and are pollinated by bees. The
plant is self-fertile.

Harvest the berries when just ripened and…

View original post 1,043 more words

How to select, prepare, store and preserve Sage [Infographic]

ecogreenlove

Sage is a prevalent herb used worldwide in cooking and herbal medicine. Whether you opt for the fresh or dried form, sage adds a warm, pine-like flavor with hints of rosemary and citrus to any dish.

View original post 294 more words

Golden Bread Magic for The Feast of The Ovens — Gather Victoria

When the landscape outside your window resembles an arctic tundra – as mine currently does – there is nothing better to turn to than warm bread fresh out of the oven. So appropriately, this hearty and flavour-filled loaf is dedicated to the Roman Goddess of Ovens, Fornax, and her February festival of baking. It’s a…

via Golden Bread Magic for The Feast of The Ovens — Gather Victoria