Sage Varieties: Growing Tips and Recipes

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

The genus Salvia contains a staggering range of species suitable for every garden use under the sun—and in the shade. But for cooking, none can rival common garden sage (Salvia officinalis) and its cultivars. Sage has long been valued for its contributions to the cook’s palette of flavors. Its robust piney aroma and earthy flavor complement many ingredients. Sage is also an attractive garden plant, particularly in its fancy-leaved forms. Plus, it prospers under a wide range of conditions and adds striking bold texture to mixed plantings.

Growing Info For Sage

• Light: Full sun
• Height: 18 to 24 inches
• Width: 24 to 36 inches
• Bloom time: Late spring, although valued most for its evergreen foliage.
• Soil: Well-drained, tolerant of a wide range of soil types.

What’s the Difference Between Types of Sage?

S. officinalis vary widely in the size and shape of its leaves. Sharp-eyed herbalists…

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Fresh Peas, Pasta and Feta

Wylde and Green

We are well on our way to July now, and the peas are ready to harvest. This is a really easy recipe using fresh peas, and garden mint, all you need to add is pasta, lemon juice and pepper.

Ingredients;


350g penne pasta (I used spaghetti as this was all I had in the house)
150g fresh peas
100g fresh broad beans if you have them
2tbsp olive oil
zest and juice of 1 lemon
150g baby spinach if you have any ready to harvest – or you can add a sprinkle of fresh mint
200g feta cheese, crumbled

What you need to do:

  1. Cook the penne in a large pan of boiling water for 5 mins. Add the peas and broad beans and cook for a further 5 mins until the penne is just tender. Drain and return to the pan.
  2. Add the olive oil, lemon zest and juice…

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Apricot Sponge Recipe

A Hundred Years Ago

apricot sponge

Apricots are my favorite June fruit. Around here, they are only available a few weeks, and each year I eagerly look forward to their appearance at the store. I recently bought some apricots, so was thrilled to find a hundred-year-old recipe for Apricot Sponge.

Apricot Sponge is a smooth, silky dessert that is served with whipped cream.

My daughter ate some Apricot Sponge, and said, “A top-five recipe.”  In her opinion, this is one of the top five hundred-year-old recipes that I’ve served her. She thinks that it tastes like a luscious dessert that she ate at a fancy restaurant.

Here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

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Edible Flower Biscuits

Wylde and Green

I always think there is something wonderfully decadent about eating flowers. They make any plate of food come to life with colour and a sense of the unexpected. I have wanted to make real flower biscuits for a while, but I had to wait until I had the right flowers. This weekend was perfect, we had a grey morning to fill and I had a small team of eager helpers. Firstly you need to pick the flowers. A simple list of edible flowers is below, pick the flowers when they are dry.

  • Borage (Starflower)
  • Broad Bean flowers – in season at the moment
  • Calendula
  • Chives
  • Coriander
  • Cornflower
  • Courgette Flower
  • Daisy
  • Elderflower
  • Honeysuckle
  • Lavender
  • Nasturtiums
  • Pansies and Violas
  • Pinks
  • Rose
  • Sage
  • Snapdragons
  • Wild Primrose

b6337084-24a2-4e48-92b1-b8d2f5d7edcaIngredients List;

  • For the biscuits —
    125g butter
    55g caster sugar
    180g plain flour
  • To decorate —
    icing Sugar
    egg white
    edible flowers
    caster sugar

Method:

  • Heat…

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Wood Sorrel Mini-Cream Tarts: Wild Food Treats — Gather Victoria

​Here’s another recipe from “Gather Cookbook” for Gather Patrons! I’m releasing a few of last year’s recipes to the Gather website – so the rest of you can see what you’re missing! First up was a Chunky Rose Petal Pesto (recipe here) and now these creamy & tangy yogurt mini-tarts. Made by processing wood sorrel leaves…

via Wood Sorrel Mini-Cream Tarts: Wild Food Treats — Gather Victoria

Chunky Rose Petal Pesto: Summer Savour — Gather Victoria

“It was June, and the world smelled of roses. The sunshine was like powdered gold over the grassy hillside.” Maud Hart Lovelace It’s been a whole year since I first started working on the “Gather Cookbook” for Gather Patrons. And since I’m going to be adding some new summer solstice recipes to the cookbook this…

via Chunky Rose Petal Pesto: Summer Savour — Gather Victoria

Tuscan Garden Kale Soup

Wylde and Green

I have a bumper crop of Kale at the moment, this recipe is perfect for cooking and storing the best of it, with soup being brilliant to freeze. It also has a lovely Mediterranean flavor so is a good soup for the summer months.

1 carrots chopped

  • 1 celery chopped
  • 1 tsp mixed herbs
  • handful of kale – stalks removed
  • 1 diced onions
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 100g farfalle pasta
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • 1 tin of canned cannellini beans
  • 1 tin of canned chopped tomatoes
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 clove of garlic crushed

Heat the oil in a pan over a medium heat. Cook the onion, celery and carrot for 5 minutes.

Add the garlic and the herbs, cook for one minute. Pour in the tomoatoes, veg stock, pasta and cennellini. Cook for 10 minutes with the lid partially on stirring occasionally.

Add the kale and cook for an…

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Creative Ways to Use Dandelions – Organic Gardening – MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Good Witches Homestead

Dandelions grow just about everywhere in the world, dotting lawns and defiantly sprouting through sidewalk cracks.  Though dandelions are incredibly common, they’re also powerful herbal medicine and tasty edibles at the same time.

Medicinally, whole dandelion plants are often made into a dandelion tincture, which has traditionally been used for skin and urinary tract problems.  Herbalists use the blossoms as a treatment for sore muscles, in the form of a dandelion salve or dandelion infused oil.

Beyond herbal medicine, dandelions are just plain tasty.  Dandelion roots can be cooked like carrots or roasted and brewed into dandelion root coffee.  The greens are eaten fresh in salads or cooked with a bit of oil or salt.  Dandelion blossoms can be made into simple dandelion fritters without much effort too.

A simple hard candy flavored with dandelion blossoms, this dandelion candy will put a…

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Herbs for Your Windowsill

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Like the idea of growing your own medicinal plants? Look no further than your windowsill or patio garden for these four standbys of ours: lemon balm, sage thyme, and peppermint. These herbs are familiar to us from grandma’s recipes and as lyrics in songs, but they may be less familiar as medicine. Lemon balm, also known as “hearts delight” and the “gladdening” herb, has long been treasured for its ability to soothe the nerves and uplift the spirit. An old Arabian proverb says that “balm makes the heart merry and joyful.” From ancient times, though, sage was used for digestive troubles, heartburn, depression, and even dementia. Thyme is excellent for treating sore throats and bronchitis. Make thyme tea with honey to soothe those colds and coughs. And women listen up, for bloating and digestive issues associated with our monthly cycle thyme is an excellent soother and diuretic. Another great herb for digestion…

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Old-fashioned Banana Fritters

A Hundred Years Ago

Banana Fritters are a wonderful comfort food, so I was thrilled to find a hundred-year-old recipe for them. The fritters were crispy; and, when served with a little confectioners sugar sprinkled on top, had just the right amount of sweetness. The fritters are made using banana slices or chunks, and when I bit into them, the embedded fruit was pure delight. This recipe is a keeper.

Here’s the original recipe:

Source: American Cookery (March, 1919)

And, here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

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