A Tree for Year Challenge

The Druid's Garden

Into the trees

One of the most common questions that people ask when they start down a druid or other nature-based spiritual path is: how do I connect deeply with nature?  Connecting to nature can happen in such a wide variety of ways.  It can happen through connecting with our heads, through learning, study, and engaging with books or classes.  It can happen through our hearts, where we emotionally connect with nature and places.  It can also happen through our bodies when we physically experience the natural world.  It can be through our spirits when we connect with the spirit of the tree.  But regardless of which of our selves and methods we use, it requires an investment of ourselves, our time, and building a relationship.

A while back, I wrote about the Druid’s Anchor Spot, which is a spot that you can use to regularly engage and observe…

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The Bee and the Machine: Moving Beyond Efficiency and towards Nature-Centeredness

The Druid's Garden

Animals have spirit!

Over the course of the last four centuries, the Western World has created a set of “unshakable” principles concerning the natural world: that nature is just another machine, that animals don’t feel and do not have souls, that plants and animals aren’t sentient. Descartes, writing in the 1600s during the early rise of mechanization, was one of the first to make this claim. He posited that animals are mechanical automata, that is, they are beings without souls, feelings, or pain. These same ideas were not limited to non-human life; we see the same kind of thinking being applied to justify slavery, genocide, colonialization, and a list of other atrocities. When we combine this kind of thinking with the economic ideas of “growth at all costs” and “efficiency”, we end up in the dystopian fiction we find ourselves living in right now. I want to take some time…

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Meaning of Life

secretsoftheserpent

What is the point of it all?  Why are we here?  Is it really to be a good boy or good girl so a bearded man will love us?  If we are not good will we get to spend the rest of eternity with a demonic man who knows how to break the rules?  Im going to burst a big bubble here.  God doesn’t care.  If god doesn’t care, is everything just random and things just happen by mistake?  Is everything meaningless?  Are we just somehow here?  We humans are not very smart.  We can’t even understand ourselves and we try to tell people we understand the universe or cosmos.  We think our petty problems are very major.  Do you think you could handle the truth? Click the continue button and we shall see.

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Working Deeply with Water: A River Healing Ritual

The Druid's Garden

A healthy stream A healthy stream

One of the incredible things about the hydrologic (water) cycle on our great planet is how connected these cycles are and how a single drop of water may continually travel the globe over a period of time. The waters that rain down upon me here in Western PA likely came after being evaporated from the Pacific Ocean and making their way in gas form across the North American continent.  From the clouds, they solidfy and rain down, slowly moving down our mountain property to the stream that sits at the bottom of our property: Penn Run.  Penn Run leads into Two Lick Creek, which runs into Blacklick creek, which runs into the Conemaugh River.  The Conemaugh becomes the Kiskiminetas, which runs into the Alleghney, which meets the Monogahela in Pittsburgh and becomes the Ohio. After passing cities such as Cincinatti and Louisville, it merges with the Mississippi…

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Ancient Americans

secretsoftheserpent

You are about to find out why the Ancient Americans were conquered, destroyed and exterminated.  This post will show what the Ancient Americans believed and taught.  It was more than a religion is was a way of life.  When I say Ancient Americans I am encompassing all civilizations that were here in the North, Central and South Americas.  The Coral Supe, Olmec, Mayan, Zapotec, Nasca, Tiwanaku, Wari, Inca, Mississippian, Polynesians, Aztecs,  all the Native Americans and Mexicans and many more.   

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Healing with the 13 Moons of Nature’s Seasons and Her Bird Tribe Women

Soul Dreamers

By Phoenix of Elder Mountain –  This is my personal capsulized short share of how I completed my fated life this lifetime as a dreamer (shaman), to return the 13 moons of the original prehistory lunar tribe of woman and brought it into a real practice and now this year offer it to the general public. The 13th Moon is a cyclical event, and she balances out the yearly seasons by appearing in cycles, but not every year. My Lunar Calendar that put together is the basis of my free lunar work-study here at Elder Mountain Dreaming, and also my life. I couldn’t really share this until the last moon, that 13th moon appeared as a real final ending to my fate. She is the mystery of the 13 moons.

This is because for millions of years we lived by the lunar seasons with mother earth and the 13 moons…

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Druidry for the 21st Century: Pandora’s Box and Tools for the Future

The Druid's Garden

The story of Pandora’s box has always been a favorite of mine, ever since I was little.  Pandora was so curious. She just had to open the box. She just had to. And when she did, she let out all the bad things in the world: suffering, pain, war, famine, pestilence, betrayal….but she also let out one good thing: she let out hope.

I think when we start talking about the present and the future of the world-its kind of like being inside Pandora’s Box. It seems that more and more reports come out, more and more news comes out, and the longer that things go on, we keep being surrounded by all the bad things. Ten or fifteen years ago, perhaps these things could be ignored.  But today, I don’t think there is any more time for that. The reports, like the recent National Climate Assessment, don’t often…

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Druidry for the 21st Century

The Druid's Garden

This is a challenging age, doubly so for anyone who is connected spiritually with the living earth and who cares deeply about non-human life. The Fourth National Climate Assessment, released towards the end of 2018, presents a dire picture for the future. This isn’t the only recent report from governing bodies globally–report after report continues to paint a clear picture of what humanity is doing, and what we need to do to change.  And yet, it seems to be business as usual.

The cycles of nature The cycles of nature

When I talk to druids about their thoughts about this present age, there seems to be a few ways to think about it.

First, the glass half empty approach is feeling extremely demoralized, looking at climate change reports and long-term forecasts and seeing the continued inaction on behalf of world leaders. The glass half empty approach may also have feelings that nothing we…

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Sacred, Spiritual Nature

Good Witches Homestead

I do not really need experts telling me that being in nature contributes to a sense of well-being – but I’m happy to see that this concept is gaining traction and press. From the age of nine or 10, I regularly ran past the placid horses in the pasture, across the brook where red-winged blackbirds sang out their cheery “konkaree,” across the far field, and finally, panting, to the bar-gate into the woods.

Ah, the sheltering, mysterious woods! Refuge from family chaos, relief from long school days. My woods offered peace and possibility. I might startle a grouse – or rather it would startle me as it whirred into the air. Maybe deer would be feeding in the abandoned field beyond the woods. I knew I was in a magical territory, the domain of fairies and nature spirits, even if I couldn’t see them.

After a long woods ramble and a…

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Druid Gratitude Practices – Nature Shrines and Offerings

The Druid's Garden

Black Raspberry in fruit Black Raspberry in fruit

Every year, I look forward to the black raspberries that grow all throughout the fields and wild places where I live. These black raspberries are incredibly flavorful with with crunchy seeds. They have never been commercialized, meaning no company has grown them for profit. You cannot buy them in the store. You can only wait for late June and watch them ripen and invest the energy in picking. Each year, the black raspberries and so many other fruits, nuts, and wild foods are a gift from the land, the land that offers such abundance.  If I would purchase such berries in a store, my relationship with those berries would be fairly instrumental–I pay for them, they become part of a transaction, and then I eat them. There is no heart in such a transaction.  But because these berries can’t be bought or sold, when I pick…

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