Ozark Encyclopedia – E – Elderberry

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Elderberry, Elder – Sambucus nigra, S. canadensis

Parts used: bark, leaf, flower, berry

Traditional uses: Berries used in formulas against chills and cold. Helps support the immune system. Infusion of berry used internally for rheumatism. Flower infusion used as a febrifuge and to sweat out a cold. Leaf infusion used to wash sores and prevent infection. Bark poultice used on sores, wounds, rashes, and other dermatological needs.

*** Cautions: Berries mildly toxic when unripe, foliage toxic in large quantities ***

Used in the “stick-notching” treatment for warts – “The stick-notching treatment used for many other ailments is also adapted to the removal of warts. A little boy near Hot Springs, Arkansas, showed me a green switch with four notches in it, tied to the end of an old wooden gutter; each notch represents a wart, he said, and as the water rushes over the notches, it gradually dissolves away…

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Poison Ivy Remedy: Jewelweed Infused Witch Hazel

The Druid's Garden

Jewelweed and Poison Ivy Like Each Other A Lot Jewelweed and Poison Ivy Like Each Other A Lot

As I spend copious time in the outdoors, I often end up covered with poison ivy at least once or twice in the summer.I happen to like poison ivy as a plant a lot–she is beautiful, she is powerful, and she teaches us awareness (more on her soon).    But the contact dermatitis that I get from her on a regular basis kind of sucks.  Given that, I have a simple recipe that I make and keep on my shelf that seeks the healing power of two other plants: witch hazel and jewelweed.  This jewelweed infused witch hazel is a great remedy for poison ivy and clears it up very quickly.

If you can’t find jewelweed, I believe this recipe would be fairly effective with plantain or chickweed.  But Jewelweed is really the best.

Harvesting Jewelweed

Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)…

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Turmeric Powder Tincture 

The Heathen Homesteader

When I first met my now husband he introduced me to herbs to help with skin issues. He suffered a skin injury that required almost a year of medical attention but wanted to help his skin in any way he could. So he looked to herbs. The best way to get the herbs he chose to help in his opinion was to ingest them. Now we use many of the herbs he loved in our food and tisanes frequently. Turmeric is one we go through a lot of. It helps with inflammation and many skin issues are the product of other health problems such as this. Check out the link at the end of this post for more in depth information.

When a neighbor/friend asked if I wanted her bag of turmeric she didn’t like (it has a peppery taste that isn’t appetizing to some) I started brewing up ideas…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – D – Dogwood

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Dogwood – Cornus florida

Parts used: root, bark, flower

Traditional uses: Roots and bark astringent, used for diarrhea and dermatological needs. Analgesic, chewed for headache, decoction rubbed on skin to relieve aches and pains. Root decoction is a febrifuge. Flowers taken for stomach complaints and colic. Infusion of inner bark used for a “lost voice” and sore throats. Root bark is a stimulant and tonic.

Protection from mad dogs – “Some woodcutters who live on Sugar Creek, in Benton county, Arkansas, believe that a mad dog never bites a man who carries a piece of dogwood in his pocket, according to an old gentleman I met in Bentonville.” ~Randolph OMF 142

“Mad dogs aren’t supposed to bite a person if they have a small piece of dogwood in their pocket.” ~Parler FBA XII 9954

Legend about flower shape – “Several tales about the dogwood tree are linked up with religious…

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Chicory Root

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Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

You may know the chicory root as a popular coffee substitute. In fact, it was widely used during the Great Depression and World War II when coffee was in short supply or too expensive. Today, it is used around the world and in the US, particularly in New Orleans, as a natural caffeine-free substitute for coffee. However, it’s much more than a rich drink.

Chicory has a long history as a cleansing medicinal herb. In fact, the ancient Egyptians were known to consume large amounts of chicory to purify the liver and blood. Romans were also known to have used the root to help with blood purification. Medieval monks cultivated the plant, and it is widely used in Europe and the Mediterranean where it natively grows.

Called kasni in the Far East, chicory contains tannin phlobaphenes and several forms of sugar. The seeds have carminative and are useful as a…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – D – Dittany

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Dittany, Stone Mint – Cunila origanoides

Parts used: leaf, flower

Traditional uses: Related to Oregano and Marjoram and can be used in similar ways. As an infusion it’s good for colds and to help open up the sinuses. Boiled strong it helps the body sweat and can aid in lowering fevers. Infusion used to help aid a painful birth. Used as a stimulant and tonic. Contains trace amounts of thujone, an active chemical also found in wormwood, mugwort, and yarrow, and may cause drowsiness or headaches. Use only in small amounts and with caution.

*** Cautions: Contains trace amounts of thujone ***

For chills – “Mountain Diteny (Cunila) is good to use to stop chills.” ~Parler FBA II 1756

For colds – “For a severe cold, make a tea of Mountain ditney…sweeten with molasses and drink one-half teacup full before going to bed.” ~Parler FBA II 1830

For fevers

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Wild Roses

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Good Witches Homestead

WILD ROSE

Fills your life with soft romance.
Gender: Feminine
Planet: Venus
Element: Water
Love. Psychic Powers. Healing. Love Divination. Luck. Protection.

WILD ROSE MAGICK

Use rosehips in healing mixtures.

Drink rosebud tea to induce prophetic dreams.

Rosebushes grown in your garden will attract faeries.

Add rose water distilled from the petals to your bath water.

Wear a chaplet of roses, or place a single rose in a vase on your altar when performing love spells to enhance the love-magic.

Common Names: Wild Rose, Dog Rose, Briar Rose
Botanical Name: Rosa canina, Rosa spp.
Family: Rosaceae
Plant Type: Shrub
Parts Used: Petals, leaves, and hips
Flowering: June

Native to Europe and Asia, R. canina is also naturalized in North America. It grows wild in hedges, along roadsides, and at the edges of meadows and woodlands.

Description: Wild rose, or Dog Rose is a shrub with arched, downward-curving branches…

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Valerian Root for Insomnia and Anxiety — Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Valerian is a plant with mild sedative properties that is sold as a sleeping aid and to treat anxiety. But does it work? In the United States (U.S.), valerian dietary supplements are usually sold as sleeping aids. In Europe, people more often take them for restlessness and anxiety. There are actually over 250 valerian species, […]

via Valerian Root for Insomnia and Anxiety — Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

African Plant Extract Offers New Hope for Alzheimer’s

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

A plant extract used for centuries in traditional medicine in Nigeria could form the basis of a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease, researchers at The University of Nottingham have found.

Their study, published in the journal Pharmaceutical Biology, has shown that the extract taken from the leaves, stem, and roots of Carpolobia lutea, could help to protect chemical messengers in the brain which play a vital role in functions including memory and learning.

The tree extract could pave the way for new drugs to tackle patient symptoms but without the unwanted side-effects associated with some current treatments.

The study was led by Dr. Wayne Carter in the University’s Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, based at Royal Derby Hospital. He said: “As a population, we are living longer, and the number of people with dementia is growing at an alarming rate. Our findings suggest that…

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Mullein Herb Medicine and Warding Off Evil

Elder Mountain Dreaming

I am picking Mullein this week nearing the New Moon and Summer Solstice, and drying it to make some tea for my detox purification that I am doing for three months. I have never had sinus until the US Air Force started spraying (chemtrails) about 8 years ago pretty heavily. When they spray I do get some sinus blockage, and it seems Mullein breaks it up and of course that is good for my body. I have a Tea Recipe, Spray for those with (asthma) and general information I found around the web…

The large flowering stems of Mullein were dried by the ancient cultures and dipped in tallow, and then used as a lamp wick or for a torch. These torches were said to ward off evil spirits and witches, although witches had these in their herbal gardens and were not the bad guys. For those interested in a…

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