Spring’s Rebirth – Slavic and Balkan Pysanky

Elder Mountain Dreaming @gmail

Compilation by Phoenix of Elder Mountain –The Rites of Spring is about honoring our rebirth and the earth’s rebirth, this has specific rituals that are ancient and help us stay connected to our moon nature, our soul and our emotional nature in a positive way. Here at Elder Mountain we do the ritual of building the archaic Goddess Marzanna Effigy (at the autumn equinox and winter solstice) and then burn and throw her into the lake or river, on the day of the Spring Equinox to transform Winter into Spring (and the symbolism of the grandmother into the maiden once again.)

A Pysanka (Ukrainian: писанка, plural: pysanky) is a spring or easter (ostara) egg, decorated with traditional folk designs using a wax-resist method. The word pysanka comes from the verb pysaty, “to write”, as the designs are not painted on, but written with beeswax. Many other eastern Europeans decorate eggs using…

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What to Harvest: March

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

There are useful plants to be harvested year round, if you pay attention to the land, the weather, and generally what’s happening outdoors around you. Here is the first installment of a series I’m going to try and maintain about what useful medicinal and edible plants are popping up throughout the year. Please note, this is based on the weather in Northwest Arkansas, so these plants may be delayed depending upon where you live.

**All medical suggestions are offered for educational purposes only and a trained medical professional should always be consulted before adding any herbs to your self-care routine.**

Wild Onions / Wild Garlic:

Sometimes also called “onion grass” this is a weed that everyone likely has in their yard (if you’ve ever mowed and thought, “Hmmm, I smell onions” you have it), but few know it’s completely edible.

Parts Used: Bulb, foliage

When to Harvest: Wild…

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Cabin Fever: You Get What You Ask For

Appalachian Ink ~ Home of Anna Wess (and Granny)

Every now and then, I get a glimpse of Granny’s wild spirit, the very one she’s kept hidden from the rest of us girls no matter how many times we’ve sat around the table in her kitchen. Sometimes, just sometimes, she lets that spirit out. And if there’s anything that’ll bring out her wild spirit, it’s cabin fever, sisters. Cabin fever and those bottled spirits in the china cabinet. And memories of them bitches, of course.

Granny turns on the radio and tunes it to her favorite station, WRIC-AM 540 radio in Richlands, Virginia, and she continues a’ singing the song in her head, some tune about Tom Dooley and his imminent demise, even while the announcer reads the local obituaries, forlorn organ a’ playing and all. Granny don’t know any of those dead people on the radio. And even if she does, she doesn’t let on. Lord, no.

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Dandelion, A Common Garden Herb

I make a wilted dandelion greens dish that’s fantastic after a long winter. Get the leaves young for eating. The older leaves are bitter.

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Taraxacum officinale

Also, Known As:

  • Blow Ball
  • Cankerwort
  • Dandelion
  • Lion’s Tooth
  • Pissabed
  • Priest’s-crown
  • Puff Ball
  • Pu Gong Ying
  • Pu-kung-ying
  • Swine Snout
  • Telltime
  • White Endive
  • Wild Endive

The dandelion is a common garden herb, with easily recognized flowers. During the spring season, the leaves and the root of the dandelion begin to produce mannitol, which is a substance utilized in the treatment of conditions such as hypertension and a weakened heart in continental Europe – where it is often prescribed by herbalist for patients with these conditions. A herbal dandelion tea made using the roots and the leaves of the herb are good to take from about the mid of March to about mid-May in the treatment of such conditions. Prepare the herbal dandelion tea in this way, first, boil a quart of water in a pot, slowly reduce the heat and then add 2 tbsp. of cleaned and chopped fresh…

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Sustainable Wild Collection Protects People, Plants, and Animals

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Chances are, you’re deeply connected with wild plants and don’t even realize it.

All of us in countless ways, whether we recognize it or not, are deeply connected to wild collecting.

Wild plants, as the term suggests, aren’t grown on farms. Instead, they’re collected in meadows, forests and deserts. Since ancient times, they’ve served as natural and essential ingredients in foods, fibers, dyes, cosmetics and traditional medicines.
Consider the açai berries in your super smoothie. They’re wild collected in the Brazilian Amazon. The pure maple syrup you save for special breakfasts most likely comes from the forests of Canada or the northern regions of the United States. The candelilla wax in your favorite skin care products originates in the deserts of northern Mexico. The licorice root used in candies and lozenges could be wild collected in many places — Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Turkmenistan or Uzbekistan. And at Wildwood Enterprises, more…

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Elderberry’s | Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism

Good Witches Homestead

CSCH is thrilled to begin the process of creating an Herbal Healing Center at Elderberry’s, a delightful 4-acre farm in Paonia, Colorado! Experience traditional Nature Cure and Vitalist therapeutics among the gardens, herb beds, fruit trees, and wildlands nearby.

Source: Elderberry’s | Colorado School of Clinical Herbalism

Elderberry’s is home to a charming, periwinkle-blue 1908 farmhouse, graced with Peach, Plum, and Apple trees, where chickens free-range among organic vegetable and herb gardens. Our botanical sanctuary is on the edge of town, in a quiet, peaceful, varied landscape with huge Cottonwood trees shading the lawns. It’s the perfect place to shed the chaos of city life and recharge your vitality. Eat fresh food right from local farms and gardens and rest in the camping meadow under brilliant stars or stay in one of our tiny houses. Find yourself at home among healing waters, where the Minnesota creek and mountain snowmelt converge…

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That Funny Little Spring Weed: Lamb’s Quarter

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Lambs quarter is one of the most common weeds in gardens, backyards, and fallow fields, following human habitation closely. If you add horse or cow manure to your garden you will have a steady supply of these tasty wild greens for most of spring and summer. Easy to recognize with its alternate, triangle-to-diamond shaped leaves which are coated on the underside with a whitish grey powdery meal resembling flour. This coating may sometimes possess a coppery-fuchsia sheen and is sold as a cultivar called “magenta spreen” in some garden catalogs. The coating is a natural part of the leaf and is fine to eat. Put a leaf under water and the meal will cause the water to bead up in a beautiful iridescent fashion. Lamb’s quarter grows to 3-5 feet and is a branching annual with a grooved stem which is often tinged with red, especially at the node, or…

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Crushed Terracotta – The Underdog Of Protection

The Witch & Walnut

crushed terracottaCrushed Terracotta is definitely the underdog of protection and often forgotten and not used. It is labor intensive and I will say this is not my favorite thing to prepare, but it must get done so here we are.

I remember ever summer when I got to my grandmothers the last thing I wanted to see after a long flight was a pile of terracotta in the corner of her yard with my name All.Over.It. It was this ongoing joke every time I walked by someone they would ask me if their terracotta was ready because they all knew it was my job. And when it ran out, it ran out until I came back! You can imagine how many pots and tiles I was hammering and grinding away. But still good memories.

Crushed terracotta is made from roof tiles or pots, each of the pieces are inscribed with various…

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Lily Lore

Good Witches Homestead

GENUS:  Lilium
Many of the 200 species of lilies are native to the United States. Plant breeders have done extensive hybridization work on the lilies to make them hardy and free flowering. Lilies are now available in every color except blue.
FAMILY:  Liliaceae
BLOOMS:  late spring
TYPE:  perennial
DESCRIPTION:  Lilies are one of the most beautiful of all garden plants. The flowers are large and deliciously colored, and they usually occur many to a stem. The height of lilies ranges between 2 to 6 feet. Flower forms include trumpet shape, pendant, flat-faced, or bowl-shaped.
CULTIVATION:  The most important requirement for growing lilies is well-drained soil. Water standing on the bulbs will cause them to rot. The bulbs should be kept cool. This can be done by overplanting with annuals or perennials. Depending on the size of the bulbs, they should be planted…

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Liebster Award Nomination


Many thanks and blessings to Paul over at pvcann for nominating me for the nomination. This is new territory for me as it is my first nomination EVER! When I open my email this morning it was, “I got what? Holy cow!” I was more than a little excited.

I am an avid reader, but I usually get distracted by real life demands before I remember to express my appreciation for the author. I’m getting better about that. So, make sure to visit pvcann for peek into his outlook into life.

Though I am writer, most of my postings are topics written by others who seem to express my thoughts better than I do, and inspire me to share.

The Liebster Award recognises and celebrates bloggers, their content, skill, and contribution to the blogging community. The rules for accepting a nomination are:

Acknowledge the blogger who nominated your blog.

Answer the questions.

Nominate 11 bloggers to encourage them.

Ask them 11 questions.

Let them know you have nominated them.

Onward to the questions:

Answer The Questions

1. Name you best travel destination.

As a retired over the road driver and gold miners, my husband and I have traveled through the 48 contiguous states. We’ve found many hidden treasures in our travels, but I would have to name Colorado Springs, Colorado as one of our best.  Though they have some of the same problems as a BIG city, it also has a small town feel. It’s only a short drive to all the things you visit Colorado to see.

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