Mushroom Colors & The Surprising Stories They Tell (new video!)

Anyone who has ever walked through the forest knows how colorful mushrooms can be.

Red, purple, blue, green, yellow, black, white… it seems that just about every color is represented in the fungal kingdom.

But have you ever asked yourself “Why?”

Why are mushrooms so colorful?  What’s the reasoning behind coloration within the fungal kingdom?  Why are some mushrooms highly pigmented while others are seemingly drab?

Fortunately, a new study has given us some answers based on trends spanning 40 years and over 3 million observations of mushrooms.

Needless to say, the results of this study are quite fascinating!

If you’re interested in hearing some surprising stories that the colors of mushrooms can tell, check out the brand new video!

 

I was a recent guest on the Awake Aware Alive⁣⁣⁣⁣⁣ Podcast hosted by Jacob Gossel.  In this interview, we discuss foraging for food, nature connection, my thoughts on hunting, and lots more!

 

Lastly (and this may pertain more to PA folks, though anyone can certainly help!), you can support a fantastic organization in Pennsylvania by voting for Pennsylvania’s River Of The Year and selecting “Buffalo Creek.”  This waterway is stewarded in part by the Audubon Society Of Western Pennsylvania and is designated an Important Bird Area due to species of concern that inhabit the area.  If Buffalo Creek receives the most votes, the Audubon Society will be awarded a grant to expand their conservation impact in this high-quality watershed.  To show your support, click this link and select “Buffalo Creek.”  It only takes a few seconds!

Thanks for reading and watching (and casting a vote if you did!), and as always, thank you for your continued support.

-Adam Haritan

Raspberry, Herb of the Year and Herb of the Month: History and Lore

The Herb Society of America Blog

HOM Brambles

By Pat Greathead

Raspberry, Rubus spp., is the International Herb Association’s Herb of the YearTM for 2020 and The Herb Society of America’s Herb of the Month for January (Brambles). The genus Rubus includes both the red and black raspberry and the blackberry as well as almost 700 other species. Rubus is in the Rosacea family.

My Wisconsin Unit of The Herb Society each year examines the IHA Herb of the Year.TM In this blog post, I have mainly focused on red raspberry leaf and have used information from many websites in writing this article. I hope you enjoy reading it as this is the year of the raspberry!

Raspberry leaves are among the most pleasant tasting of all the herbal remedies, with a taste much like black tea, without the caffeine. Raspberries are native to Asia and arrived in North America via prehistoric people, with the first…

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Do Plants Scream When Stressed? A Brand New Study Has Some Answers

Noises associated with plants aren’t unfamiliar to those of us who spend time with plants.  We hear plants in the wind, in the rain, and even when fruit capsules explode to release seeds.

Generally, plant noises are considered to be the by-products of mechanical processes, rather than the ways in which plants intentionally communicate with other organisms.

In fact, it almost seems too esoteric to suggest that plants communicate using sounds, yet new research offers insights into the unique ways in which plants may do just that.

Interestingly, many news outlets have picked up on this story and are now reporting on the ability of plants to “scream” in stressful situations.  These situations include drought-like conditions and the physical cutting of stems.

But is that what plants are really doing?  “Screaming” when cut or deprived of water?

That’s the topic of this week’s video, so if you’re unfamiliar with the ability of plants to emit informative airborne sounds in stressful situations, check it out!

Mushrooms utilize all kinds of organic material for sustenance… including the stems and leaves of moss.  If you’re unfamiliar with this particular moss-loving fungus, check out the recent Instagram post!

Thanks for reading and watching, and as always, thank you for your continued support.

-Adam Haritan

Baba Yaga’s Wild Spiced Honey Cookies — Gather Victoria

Ever since I called upon Baba Yaga to be my winter baking muse this season – I’ve had nothing but trouble. Which should have been no surprise, Baba Yaga is renowned for testing your mettle with endless impossible tasks which determine whether she will help you- or hinder you – according to her liking! And…

via Baba Yaga’s Wild Spiced Honey Cookies — Gather Victoria

Two More Reasons To Add Mushrooms To Your Holiday Menus

Greetings!

If you’re looking for reasons to eat more mushrooms, read on.

Two new relevant studies were published in the scientific literature this past year, each one highlighting the importance of mushrooms in the human diet.

1. Mushroom consumption and mild cognitive impairment

As part of a recent study design, and to determine any association between mushroom consumption and mild cognitive impairment, researchers in Singapore analyzed diet and lifestyle factors of 663 participants over the age of 60.

After controlling for factors including age, education, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activities, meat consumption, and vegetable consumption, participants who consumed greater than 2 portions of mushrooms per week had lower odds of having mild cognitive impairment compared to participants who consumed mushrooms less than once per week.

Findings were similar in males and females, and results were published in the Journal Of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Researchers concluded:  “Mushroom  consumption could be a potential preventive measure to slow cognitive decline and neurodegeneration in aging.”

 2. Mushroom consumption and prostate cancer

A brand new study published in the International Journal Of Cancer looked at the association between mushroom consumption and prostate cancer in over 36,000 Japanese men between the ages of 40 and 79.

This was the first long-term cohort study ever published on the subject.  (A cohort study follows participants over time to determine the incidence of, or mortality from, a disease or other outcome.)

Results indicated that higher mushroom consumption in men over the age of 50 was related to a lower risk of incident prostate cancer.  Additionally, researchers found a beneficial effect of mushroom consumption on the prevention of prostate cancer regardless of clinical stage of tumor development (localized or advanced and metastatic).

Researchers in this study concluded that “habitual mushroom intake might help to reduce prostate cancer risk.”

So… if you needed yet another reason to eat more mushrooms, perhaps these two studies will influence your decision in a positive manner.

Lastly, today (Sunday) is the last day to enroll in Foraging Wild Mushrooms, as registration will close at midnight.  This online course is designed to teach you the skills necessary to safely and confidently harvest wild fungi for food, for medicine, for study, and for fun.

Additionally, a portion of all proceeds derived from course sales will be donated to the Pennsylvania Parks & Forest Foundation — a nonprofit organization whose mission it is to inspire stewardship of Pennsylvania’s beautiful state parks and forests.

You can learn more about the course here.

Thanks for reading, and I hope you’ll consider adding more mushrooms to your holiday menus!

-Adam Haritan

Full Cold Moon Spell Cookies

Spirit de la Lune Cold Moon Ceremony

Happy Full Cold Moon!

For many of us, this Full Moon reaches its peak fullness at 12:12 on 12/12 this year!

This full moon activates the powerful numerology code of 12! 12 is a number of wholeness and completion. This full moon illuminates the completion of our our journey throughout this past year and helps us see the bigger picture of just how far we have come. This powerful full moon is helping many realize a shift in consciousness.

If you are sensitive to energy, you may have been feeling this powerful portal opening for some time now. You might be feeling anxious or restless if you haven’t been living up to your potential or fulfilling your purpose. This is not a punishment… this is a reminder and a call to evolve!

2019 is a 3 number, and 12/12 also translate to 3, making today a 333 day. 333 is a number of big changes and the expression of our truth. 333 carries the energy of 9, which is another number of wholeness and completion. It’s time to prepare for the big changes that 2020 holds for us while also reflecting on our journeys from 2019.

Moments after the moon reaches her peak fullness, Chiron, the wounded healer goes direct. Chiron has been retrograde since July of this last year. When this asteroid stations direct, under the light of the Full moon, you might feel a sense of clarity about your journey of healing over this last year. Some past triggers from that time might get pulled up for reevaluation and healing once again, but remember this is part of the journey.

The healing journey moves in spirals and holds many ebbs and flow. Embrace what comes up! Feel and heal your way through it.

The Cold Moon represents the time when we are called inward to experience the quiet reflection of our own souls. A sense of hibernation and rest comes with this full moon.

The moon in Gemini also represents the mind as well as our connection and ability to communicate with others. This is a time to gather with friends and family around the fire. Seek comfort in the quiet long nights and the closeness this time of year can provide!

Read complete article at: Spirit de la Lune ~ Full Cold Moon Spell Cookies

Foraging Wild Mushrooms — Online Course Registration Open For Limited Time

Greetings!

In anticipation of the winter mushroom season, and at the request of those eager to pursue educational opportunities during the winter months, I decided to open the doors to Foraging Wild Mushrooms for the next 5 days.

This 4-season online course is designed to help you safely, successfully, and confidently forage wild mushrooms from the forest, from the field, and even from your own backyard!

Whether you’re interested in foraging for food, for medicine, for study, or just for fun, Foraging Wild Mushrooms covers the most important lessons to get you started.

In addition to over 70 step-by-step exclusive and instructional videos included within the course, you’ll also receive:

  • Supplemental handouts covering mushroom anatomy, terminology, and biology that you can download and print for easy viewing.
  • A 42-page guide to medicinal mushrooms that summarizes the latest research on the most popular medicinal fungi and features over 75 peer-reviewed references.
  • Immediate and lifetime access to all materials.

Additionally, I’m equally (if not more) excited to let you know that a portion of all proceeds derived from course sales will be donated to the Pennsylvania Parks & Forest Foundation — a nonprofit organization whose mission it is to inspire stewardship of Pennsylvania’s beautiful state parks and forests.

As you may or may not know, a good bit of Learn Your Land’s educational programming is filmed on-site within many of Pennsylvania’s state parks and forests.  To express gratitude, and to ensure that these wild places exist for generations to come, I find it imperative to support organizations that in turn directly support the forests.

Therefore, a portion of all proceeds derived from this enrollment period will be donated to the Pennsylvania Parks & Forest Foundation.

Please note that enrollment for Foraging Wild Mushrooms is open for 5 days only — from today until Sunday, December 15th at midnight.  After that, enrollment will be closed.

To learn more about the course, check out this video which gives an overview of what you can expect.

I hope to see you in there!
—Adam Haritan

The Curious Lives Of Carnivorous Mushrooms (New Video!)

 

Greetings!

Before I share this week’s brand new video with you, I’d like to mention that I’ll be sending out another email tomorrow — Wednesday, December 11th — with a special announcement inside.

If you’re interested in reading more about the announcement, be sure to check your inbox tomorrow!

Moving forward, let’s discuss something that sounds a bit more like science fiction than fact.

Carnivorous mushrooms.

Many people are unaware that fungi have the ability to capture and consume living members of the animal kingdom.  Interestingly, researchers have been studying the topic of carnivorous fungi for over a century.

More than just a quirk of nature, carnivorous fungi represent hundreds of species that commonly inhabit woods, forests, and fields.  They’re so common that, if you’re a fan of wild edible mushrooms, there’s a good chance you’ve eaten a carnivorous species on at least one occasion.

As is my habit, I decided to film a video in celebration of these accomplished hunters and trappers.

If you’re interested in learning more, check it out!

 

While recently spending some time in sunny San Diego, I had the unique opportunity to visit what is considered to be the rarest pine tree in the United States.  To learn more about this 5-needled, cliff-dwelling species, check out the recent Instagram post!

Thanks for reading and watching, and remember… be sure to check your inbox tomorrow for the special announcement!

-Adam Haritan

KidsGardening Program Spotlight – The Klamath Food Forest

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

This Gro More Good Grassroots Grant winner created a food forest to help Klamath youth learn about local food, revive traditional sustainable food, and more

Source: KidsGardening Program Spotlight – The Klamath Food Forest

One of the 2019 Gro More Good Grassroots Grant Winners, The Family Resource Center of the Redwoods, is partnering with the Community Food Council for Del Norte and Tribal Lands (DNATL) to help create new and sustainable sources of food for members of their community. Located in the far northwest corner of California, they serve rural areas that are isolated and do not have grocery stores readily available. One of the projects their Grassroots Grant money assisted with was the Au-Minot ‘we-nue-nep-ueh (Klamath Food Forest) at Margaret Keating Elementary School.

The Klamath Food Forest is one of four food forest sites developed in the region. This particular program is located on an elementary school campus…

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The Medicine of Pine

Written and Photographed by Juliet Blankespoor

 

 

My kindergarten school picture is the first evidence of a lifelong love affair with trees, and pine in particular. My dad had planted a little grove of white pines (Pinus strobus, Pinaceae) in our backyard. I spent my afternoons playing in their whorled branches, unwittingly collecting resin in my locks while leaning my head against their sturdy trunks. My mom cut out the sticky parts, resulting in a hairstyle that could only be rivaled by the likes of Pippi Longstocking.

There are over one hundred species of pine worldwide, and most have recorded medicinal uses. Cultures around the globe have used the needles, inner bark, and resin for similar ailments.1,2,3 Internally, pine is a traditional remedy for coughs, colds, allergies, and urinary tract and sinus infections. Topically, pine is used to address skin infections and to lessen joint inflammation in arthritic conditions.4 Native people across the continent—including the Cherokee, Chippewa, Iroquois, Apache, Hopi and countless other groups—have used over twenty species of pine in a similar medicinal fashion.1

Along with its myriad medicinal applications, pine is a source of lumber, food, essential oil production, and incense. There are a few species of pine in North America and a handful of species in Eurasia that yield the familiar edible pine nuts. Pine is essential commercially for its lumber and pulp, which is used to make paper and related products.

Many species of pine are considered cornerstone species, playing a central role in their ecological community. See my article on longleaf pine here. Finally, many species are planted ornamentally for their evergreen foliage and winter beauty.

Read complete article at: Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine ~ The Medicine of Pine