How to Open, Clear, and Balance the Chakras with Crystals

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Good Witches Homestead

If you want to be healthy, happy, and spiritually connected, it all starts with your chakras and bio-energetic system. Your chakras are power points or gateways into the human energy system. They receive energy from the environment, which is circulated through the entire energy system via the meridians. The seven major chakras are located in a centerline at the core of your body. Each one has physical, emotional, and mental correspondences, and they each resonate with a specific color frequency.

If you are experiencing an imbalance or challenge in some area of your life, it might indicate that one or more of your chakras could use a tune-up. Chakras can become blocked due to unprocessed emotional energy, unhealthy mental patterns, toxins, negative energy, stress, past life and genetic line patterns, and other causes. An energy blockage in a chakra creates a deficiency in energy, which can eventually lead to dis-ease…

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Super Seven Healing Quartz Stone

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Good Witches Homestead

“Super seven” stone, also referred to as “Sacred seven” or “Melody stone”, is a quartz stone that contains seven materials; goethite, cacoxenite, rutile, lepidocrocite, amethyst, clear quartz and smoky quartz. Super seven stone is not much to look at; in fact, it looks like a dirty quartz gem with some purple amethyst zoning. However, those who believe in the power of crystal healing claim that the combination of the seven materials is extremely beneficial. Let’s learn a little more about the parts that make up this special stone.

Goethite is a brown-black or yellow-brown mineral that occurs mainly as fibrous crystals. It is made up of oxyhydroxide iron. Though it can be made into gemstones, it is rarely seen. Goethite is said by crystal healers to be a stone of communication, both physical and spiritual. Cacoxenite is a yellow, orange, green or brownish hydrous iron phosphate mineral that grows in fibrous bundles. Therefore, it is not suitable as a gemstone material…

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Amy Brucker ~ My Cat Angus Died This Week ~

By Amy Brucker

My cat Angus died this past Thursday. He was 18 years old and a little shaman who would curl up next to my clients and do his part to help them in their healing process.

He lived a long, good life, but it was time for him to say goodbye, and October was the perfect time for him to leave.

October is a Time for Releasing

Of releasing golden leaves that fall like confetti to the ground.

Of releasing grief so it can flow through us (instead of turning into depression).

Of releasing whatever is getting in the way of you living a good life.

Releasing Angus was a process for me. His small body started to decline a couple years ago, so I was able to prepare for the inevitable.

Every day I gave thanks for his grace in my life, for his presence. I reveled in his softness, knowing that someday it would be a memory. I took mental pictures, memorizing the subtle angles of his nose and chin, noticing how he sometimes looked like Homer Simpson, but other times like a wise Buddha, and laughing at the juxtaposition.

Releasing can be a big dramatic ritual with heart-wrenching cries, or a simple whisper of goodbye.

But however you express it, the most important thing is to be present. Presences gives your heart a chance to really feel your feelings, to give the mix of sadness and joy a place to co-exist so they can weave together a healing balm for your soul.

I said goodbye to Angus this morning, full of tears and a heavy heart. I created an altar with his photo, his favorite toy, some treats, and a candle. I’m grateful for how he shared his life with me.

What about you?

What do you need to be present with today?

What do you need to release? How does your heart feel in releasing it?

How can you make room for the joy and the sorrow so you can create your own soul medicine?

sweet dreams to you,

Amy

Crystal Towers

By Sonia Acone

Crystal towers are usually 6-sided crystals that converge to a point on one end and are flat on the other end. They can often be confused with obelisks, which are 4-sided. Towers are designed to stand up with the point facing up. Energy is directed upward towards the point and outward. Crystal towers are also wonderful Generator crystals and can be used in grid layouts as the central stone.

You can also use a tower to amplify your intentions when using a grid, by touching the point of the tower to each of the crystals in your crystal grid, even if the central stone is not a tower. This will magnify the energy spreading throughout your crystal grid.

Towers can also be used just as you would a wand, as they generate power at the tip. Write down a wish or intention. Touch the tip of the tower to the written words as you say them out loud, raise the tip up towards the sky and back down to the written words.

Use your crystal tower during meditation, distance healing or even on yourself to increase enthusiasm, relieve pain and to connect to other like-minded people.

Herbs To Have In Your Medicine Cabinet This Fall

Good Witches Homestead

It’s the time of year, where more often than not we are turning to our medicine cupboard to support our bodies and our families. An abundance of tea herbs, honey, and lemon, fresh herbs like ginger, turmeric, cayenne, and garlic are all great to have on hand throughout the winter. A few herbal tinctures also play useful roles and are key ingredients in the medicine cabinet.

elderflowerElderberry | Elderberry is an excellent superfood-like ally safe to take in large quantities. With elderberry and plenty of rest, our body’s natural response kicks in–that’s why elderberry syrups and tea have long been used to help support optimal immune function. All these amazing herbs come in handy when our resources are low: elderberry helps our body maintain its normal immune response. Because it’s so much like food, it’s incredibly safe for kids, and happens to taste divine when combined with honey–hence the elderberry syrup! This one…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Horsemint

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Horsemint – Monarda bradburiana (often several of the Monarda genus)

Parts used: leaf, flower

Traditional uses: Infusion used for colds, chills, as a febrifuge, and for bowel complaints. Can be used externally in oils and salves for dermatological needs. Used in many of the same ways as Monarda fistulosa.

For stomach cramps and bellyache – “Red-pepper tea, catnip tea, horsemint (Monarda) tea all of these are mightily cried up as remedies for stomach cramps or bellyache.” ~Randolph OMF 95-96

Tea used for worms – “Horsemint tea is supposed to be a sure cure for rectal worms in children.” ~Randolph OMF 106-107

For diarrhea – “Horse mint (Monarda) is good for diarea.” ~Parler FBA II 2067

For kidney health – “Horse Mint (Monarda) leaves to make a tea out of helps the kidneys.” ~Parler FBA III 2596


Moerman, Daniel E. Native American Ethnobotany (NAE)

Parler, Mary Celestia Folk Beliefs from…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Horehound

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Horehound – Marrubium vulgare

Parts used: leaf, flower

Traditional uses: Infusion of whole plant used for flushing the kidneys. Taken for colds. Mixed with sugar to make cough syrup. Decoction of leaves used for coughs.

“White Horehound has long been noted for its efficacy in lung troubles and coughs…Preparations of Horehound are still largely used as expectorants and tonics. It may, indeed, be considered one of the most popular pectoral remedies, being given with benefit for chronic cough, asthma, and some cases of consumption…Taken in large doses, it acts as a gentle purgative. The powdered leaves have also been employed as a vermifuge and the green leaves, bruised and boiled in lard, are made into an ointment which is good for wounds.” ~Grieve MH 

Bitter tea used for colds – “Horehound is one of the best cold remedies. Just take a panful of horehound leaves, add water, and keep…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Honey

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Vinegar and honey for arthritis – “I’ve always heard vinegar and honey is good for arthritis.” ~Carter and Krause HRIO 21

Vinegar and honey for a cough – “We made out own cough syrup with honey and white vinegar. We put half honey and half white vinegar and one quarter water, stir that real good. Take two or three tablespoons before breakfast or at night. It’ll work good.” ~Carter and Krause HRIO 6

Honey and pine tar for coughs – “A long time ago they made cough syrup out of honey and pine tar.” ~Carter and Krause HRIO 7

Honeycomb for colds – “Chewing honeycomb will relieve a stuffy nose and enable you to breathe better.” ~Parler FBA II 1826


Carter, Kay & Bonnie Krause Home Remedies of the Illinois Ozarks (HRIO)

Parler, Mary Celestia Folk Beliefs from Arkansas (FBA)

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Hole Stones

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Use of the hole stones – “Many of the old settlers say that it is good luck to find a rock with a hole in it, but that such a stone found in running water is super lucky. At several homes in the Ozarks I have seen little boxes containing stones with holes in them, placed under the porch or the wooden doorstep. Near Marvel Cave, in Taney county, Missouri, the Lynch sisters who own the cavern used to have a lot of these stones strung on wire; when Nancy Clemens and I visited the place in 1936, Miss Miriam Lynch took down one of these wires and gravely presented each of us with a lucky stone. Some say that lucky stones keep off witches and evil spirits; others tie one of the stones to a bedpost in the belief that it somehow prevents nightmare.” ~Randolph OMF 60

Carried for…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Hickory

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Hickory – Carya 

Parts used: leaf, stem, nuts

Traditional uses: Leaves can be used for headaches and poultices. Bark can be used to help treat arthritis. The sap of the shagbark hickory is used like sugar or maple syrup.

Pegging for malaria, chills, fever, etc. – “To cure malaria, chills, fever, and ague all you need is a hickory peg about a foot long. Drive it into the ground in some secluded place, where you can visit it unseen. Do not tell anyone about this business. Go there every day, pull up the peg, blow seven times into the hole, and replace the peg. After you have done this for twelve successive days, drive the peg deep into the earth so that it cannot be seen, and leave it there. You’ll have no more chills and fever that season. If the cure doesn’t work, it means that you have been…

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