What are Meridians? – Holistic Experiment

by Lucia Santos

Dubbed as the “primo-vascular system” by the scientists at Seoul National University, Meridians are a channel system that carries and distributes qi (energy) and blood. These Meridians work as conduit for energy to organs, endocrines, and body parts. Acupuncture, acupressure, and Reiki work with these meridians to remove any sort of blockage or imbalance in the body.

There are 12 primary paired meridians and two single mid meridians; six of them are yang (which is male and active) and the rest are yin (which are female and passive). The yang meridians run down the body while the yin meridians flow up the body. Each meridian is related to the elements of Earth, Metal, Fire, Wood or Water, which gives us the tools for treating imbalances that come from a lack or surplus of certain channels.

The most interesting fact is that each meridian is extremely active at a certain time of the day or night. For example, from 3AM to 5AM the qi (energy) is flowing through the Lung Meridian and later on enters the Large Intestine Meridian from 5-7Am, and then the Stomach Meridian from 7-9AM. The meridian cycle is continuous as the qi or energy flows throughout the body. If you’re curious about finding out more about the Qi Current, check out this interesting post.

Also, since sickness can happen when there’s a blockage of energy or when the ying and yang balance (also known as the male and female balance) in our bodies is disturbed. These meridians can show how an imbalance in an organ can cause symptoms in a completely different area of the body.

The twelve meridians are named according to their corresponding organs, these include:

  • Three arm yin meridians which focuses on the lungs, pericardium, and heart
  • Three arm yang meridians that focuses on the large intestine, triple burner, and small intestine.
  • Three leg yang meridians which focuses on the stomach, gallbladder, and the bladder
  • Three leg yin meridians that focuses on the spleen, liver, and kidney.

These twelve meridians make up the majority of the Meridian system and are known as the regular or principal channel. As mentioned before, there are various methods that will help balance the body such as Reiki, Acupuncture, Acupressure, and Yoga.

Meridians show that the human body is connected to the elements, the energetic structure and flow of energy at a cellular and physical level. It’s also said that Earth has energetic pathways or ley lines that are similar to the meridians in our bodies.

Source: What are Meridians? – Holistic Experiment

Would the government let Jesus cure cancer? « Jon Rappoport’s Blog

By Jon Rappoport

As I’ve been telling you for years, it’s easy to keep the public on your side if you regularly tout medical “breakthroughs” in the press. The latest innovation. The promise of a cure around the corner. The maybe-could-be discovery that will change the course of disease treatment forever.

In this case, a start-up called Tilos has one of those, for cancer. They say it’s an antibody their researchers came across while looking for a cure for MS. They stumbled on to it by accident. Aha.

Somehow, this antibody helps the immune system to recognize and wipe out cancer cells. It produces “a memory” in immune-system cells, and they are ready to go to war when cancer arrives. Or something. It’s hard to say.

The people at Tilos are, naturally, very enthusiastic.

So forthwith, I give you an assignment. Keep track of stories about this amazing antibody as time passes, and see whether it ever a) becomes a real cancer treatment, and b) does any good. Or c) disappears down the memory hole, never to be heard from again. I’m betting on c. Why? Because I’ve watched a number of these flashes dim out quickly and recede into nowhere land. And because, in this case, the company is very far from being able to fashion the antibody into a ground-level treatment. Of course, it’s possible that, on the basis of the recent gaudy announcement, Tilos could pick up some investor funding, but funding isn’t a disease treatment the last time I looked.

On the other hand, if a non-pharmaceutical company or researcher actually makes a promising discovery in cancer treatment (read about the troubles of Dr. Stan Burzynski, Dr. Willam Koch, Royal Rife, etc.), all hell breaks loose. The press immediately pounces on the researcher as if he’s working on an H-bomb in his basement. He must be an outright quack and charlatan, “because they all are.”

Corporate drug outfit=potential breakthrough.

Independent non-pharmaceutical researcher=Dr. Nazi.

Good press vs. bad press comes down to: how much can you pay; who do you know; how much advertising can you afford to buy; what official expert can you bring on board to vouch for you; is your product a drug rather than a detested natural non-patentable substance; can you do officially recognized clinical trials; are you connected with a favored group (university, research foundation, federal facility, pharma lab) who can obtain publication in a well-known medical journal.

Or are you a dreaded INDEPENDENT?

In the 1990s, I watched a federal trial in a Los Angeles courtroom. The defendant was charged with selling medical drugs without a license to practice medicine.

The defendant was prepared to argue that a) the substance he was selling was naturally produced in the body and b) it was effective.

The prosecution moved to exclude such testimony, on the grounds that it was irrelevant.

The judge agreed. Therefore, the trial was nasty, brutish, and short. The defendant was found guilty and sentenced to prison for several years.

This is how the federal bureaucracy operates. “Do you have a government-issued license to heal? No? You’re a criminal.”

I believe that if Jesus of Nazareth were walking the Earth today, in the United States, he would be arrested on the same grounds.

This would be particularly so if he were curing cancer.

Imagine this extreme case: in a stadium packed with 50,000 people who have been diagnosed with cancer, Jesus of Nazareth waves his hand and cures all of them in a few seconds.

Now he is threatening the profits of many companies, to say nothing of the power of the government, which backs the chemo-radiation-surgery monopoly to the hilt.

So he is arrested. He is put on trial. He opts to defend himself without an attorney. He tells the court that curing cancer is no crime.

The prosecuting attorney objects. “Your Honor,” he says, “whether or not this man has cured cancer is beside the point. He has no license to practice medicine. That is why we are here today. We are simply establishing that a) he was practicing medicine and b) he has no government-issued license. That is the scope of this proceeding.”

The judge agrees. The verdict is issued. Guilty.

Of course, on another front, the major media, who depend for their existence on pharmaceutical advertising, take the ball and run with it. The networks and major newspapers seek out “experts,” who emphatically state that what Jesus of Nazareth “performed” in the stadium was mere hypnotism. It was all a placebo effect. Whatever sudden “remissions” may have occurred are just temporary. Tragically, the cancers will return.

Not only that, these 50,000 people have effectively been sidetracked and diverted from seeking “real care from real doctors.” With chemo, with radiation, with surgery, they would have stood a chance of surviving and living long normal lives.

Other media pundits send up this flag: “Many of those present in the stadium were bitter clingers to their religion. They refuse to accept science. They are living in the past. They favor superstition over real medical care. In fact, they are threatening the whole basis of healthcare, since other confused and deluded Americans may now turn away from doctors and seek snake-oil salesmen and preachers for healing.”

From the highest perches of political power in this country, the word quietly goes out to the media: don’t follow up on those people who were in the stadium; don’t try to track them; don’t compile statistics on their survival rates; move on to other stories (distractions); let this whole madness die down.

But among the citizenry, an awareness spreads: the government is controlling healing through its issuance of licenses. That’s how the government is essentially protecting one form of “healing” and enabling it to become an all-encompassing cartel.

What would be the alternative or the adjunct to licenses?

Contracts.

Contracts are agreements entered into by consenting adults, who assume responsibility for the outcomes. In the case of healing, a contract would specify that people have a right to be wrong.

Let’s say two consenting adults, Jim and Frank, agree to allow Frank to treat Jim for his arthritis with water from a well on Frank’s land.

The two men acknowledge that no liability will be attached to the outcome. In other words, whether Jim get better or gets worse, no one is going file a suit. No one is going to go to the government for redress of wrongs.

The well water may be wonderful or it may be completely useless. Both men understand and acknowledge that. But they assert a right to try the treatment, because they are free.

Immediately people say, “This is ridiculous. Water can’t cure arthritis. Frank is cheating Jim. Jim is a victim. He needs to see a doctor. He needs to go on arthritis drugs.”

No, Jim doesn’t have to do anything. He is free.

To put it another way, Jim has the right to be right or wrong. It’s his decision, which is beyond the scope of any authority.

If government tries to remove that right from all of us, it is essentially saying it knows what is correct, it knows what is true, it knows what we need and require, and it’s going to give it to us even if it has to shove it down our throats. Does that sound like freedom to you?

If Jesus of Nazareth lived in the United States today, and if he went around curing cancer, he would be arrested. He wouldn’t be charged with blasphemy or treason. He would be charged with something much simpler and more mundane: practicing medicine without a license.

And he would be convicted and sentenced.

Because then and now, the government, in its throne of corruption, wants to protect its proprietary and illegal interests.

Source: Would the government let Jesus cure cancer? « Jon Rappoport’s Blog

On Keeping a Spiritual Journal | The Druid’s Garden

Recently, I took some time to go back through the many spiritual journals I have kept on my journey deeper into the mysteries of the druid tradition and my relationship with nature. These journals spanned over a decade. They included a bit of everything: garden interactions, meditations, nature observations, events in my life of deep spiritual significance, recipes, notes from gatherings and visits, stories, experiences with rituals, and much more. I am so grateful to have kept these journals and re-reading them allowed me to rediscover so many pieces about that journey. They allowed me to see not only my own growth over time, but reminded me of important events and encouraged me further on my path.

 

Journaling and writing down one’s journey doesn’t come easy for many, and I, too, have to work at it!  Further, in working with those new to the druid path through my work as an Archdruid with the AODA, I’ve come to realize that many folks don’t know how to keep a spiritual journal nor what it can be used for or why they should do it. In my professional work as a writing professor, I know how difficult it is for some people to write anything because they lack the tools, motivation, or inspiration to do so. So, given this, I thought I’d take the time today to write about spiritual journals, why we keep them, and tips and strategies for keeping them (and keeping them well).

 

Why keep a spiritual journal?

When you are engaging in a spiritual practice of any kind, it is really helpful to document that practice. So let’s start by exploring the reasons why you would want to keep a spiritual journal.

 

The difference between sacred spaces and mundane spaces. One of the aspects of spiritual practices is that we are in a different head space for the duration of those practices than we are in the regular world. This is true not only of meditation and rituals but also of visits to natural places. We may gain deep insights or have moments of clarity and awakening and retaining those insights are critical for our development. If we don’t write them down, we are very apt to lose them.

 

I have found that in order to “not lose anything,” I have to write down my experiences in ritual or meditation immediately after they happen (often, I will write in my journal before I even close a sacred grove in ritual or before I leave the forest). This allows me to write about these experiences while they are fresh and in the forefront of my head. If I put off writing down my experiences, the longer that time goes by, the less I will remember and remember accurately–especially because visits to wild places and rituals alter our consciousness.

 

Inaccuracy of memory. Our memories are imperfect instruments and we can forget many things. If we write our experiences and understandings down (or use one of the other methods I share here), we offer our future selves a record of those experiences, which is a powerful spiritual tool. Trying to keep everything in our heads is a sure way to lose some of the critically important details or insights we gain as part of our spiritual practices.

 

Some journals that are mixed media/collage with spiritual themes...

Some journals that are mixed media/collage with spiritual themes…

To illustrate this, I’ll share a story here. I was out foraging for the day by myself, and I ended up in a really brushy area that required me to slog my way through about a two-acre bramble and brush patch. During this experience, I was in a deep meditative space. I had a critical number of keen insights about nature–all in a row (it must have been the stars aligning). The problem is, I had too many at once! (One of those keen insights about nature became my earlier discussion of weedtending, weedwalking, and weedcrafting while a second became my discussion of first-aid responder plants). I had recently lost my small journal I usually carried in my crane bag (to a river–it carried it away!), so I didn’t have anything to write down my insights on that particular day. And so, lacking any other means, I tried to commit as many as I could to memory. When I finally got back later that evening, all had escaped except the insights on the two posts I included above. Try and meditate as I might, I could not find the other insights anywhere in my brain–they were left in the bramble patch!

 

Keeping a Record. Documenting your practices and experiences through journals offers your future self a record about what you are feeling, experiencing, and the things you are engaging with at that particular point in time. This is a wonderful tool for tracking and understanding your own spiritual development. I love going back and reading my old journals and seeing just how far I have come! It’s also helpful to look at the journals and get a sense of what I was struggling with then, what I’m still struggling with, and what new things have come up.

 

Focusing, Expanding, and Reflection on Your Thoughts.  Journaling is not just a process of writing down exactly what happened or what the insights were, but it’s also a powerful tool and opportunity to ponder or sit with those experiences further.  And so, we gain a double benefit from this work. Reflecting on experiences that just happened allows you another way, which I see as another form of meditation, into those experiences. First, I have found often that after I finish a physical journey, spiritual journey, meditation, ritual, or whatever, writing down what has happened and my thoughts and insights about what has happened allows me to further shape and expand those thoughts (and actually, this is why I got into blogging!)  Part of it is that you are not just getting the initial insight, but taking the time to think about it deeper and focus on it through the journaling experience. This helps the insights and experiences come into sharper focus. Second, reflection also allows us to slow down and think about what we experienced, synth sizing our experiences and our own understandings. We can pick things apart, turn them around, wonder about them, and really gain the ability to see them from multiple angles there in our journal.  It might be that this kind of work needs to happen over a longer period of time than one entry, and that is perfectly acceptable as well.  I’ll also mention here that research in writing studies strongly supports both of the above–we learn through writing and we gain much from reflection!

 

Content of the Journals: What to Write

The question of what should go into a journal is obviously a very personal one.  Here are some possibilities for you to consider:

 

Documenting regular practices. In many of the esoteric traditions, keeping a “magical journal” is a required practice. It’s very helpful to document regular practices and their effects, especially over time. For example, each day I do the AODA’s Sphere of Protection ritual. In the years I was really learning it, I wrote down daily what happened. Now that my practice has stabilized, I no longer find it necessary to write down each day’s sphere unless something out of the ordinary happens during the sphere; but I still find myself writing about it regularly. I do write about my regular meditations, and that’s part of my habitual journal practice.

 

Some more spiritually-themed journals with colorful watercolor pages...

Some more spiritually-themed journals with colorful watercolor pages…

Salient, important things. I once spoke with a woman who told me she was spending more time writing in her journals than in her spiritual practices and was frustrated with the length of time it took to journal. I inquired further and discovered that she was writing down literally everything she was doing. While this certainly is an approach that you can take to spiritual journaling, I’m not sure its one I’d advocate. You’d spend more time, as she did, writing than actually engaging in your spiritual practices! Instead, what I advocate is writing down things of meaning, of salience, and of significance. In other words, I don’t write down every little thing (“I drove to the park”) but I do generally document what I did, what happened, and what I thought about it (“in my walk in the woods, this struck me because of…”).

 

Ideas, Plans, and Goals. I have found it useful to write about goals, ideas, and plans. If you write goals, check in on them regularly and see how you are progressing with them (a simple goal might be to develop a regular daily protective practice, or to spend more time in nature, or to observe the full and new moons in some way).

 

Nature observations. I have found it particularly helpful to document my observations and interactions with nature, given that I’m on a path of nature-based spirituality. For this reason, I almost always take a journal when I’m going out and about (even a small one I can carry with me, although I have a propensity for small journals getting eaten by bodies of water!)

 

Some nice leather journals (both filled!)

Some nice leather journals (both filled!)

Reflections over time. At the end of the journal, when I have only 10-20 or so pages left, I find it really useful to go back through the journal and record any patterns in my thinking, any changes, anything that sticks out of significance to me. It may take me a year or more to fill a journal, but is a very good practice and then helps me “launch” the next journal with a vision and goals in mind.

 

Photos, drawings, plant matter, and memorabilia. You don’t have to be limited to words alone–consider adding drawings, photos, plant matter, and other memorabilia.

 

The Look and Feel of Your Journal

Especially when you are starting out, the finding or making the right journal is really important. There’s something about opening up a fine journal, one that you are attracted to, and writing in it. It’s nice to see it sitting on our shelf, nice to hold and cherish. Your journal might be something you make or something you buy. (I can write a post on bookbinding and spiritual journal making if there is interest. Let me know!) You may also find that you may develop certain preferences (thickness of paper, lined or unlined, etc).

 

I think that there is something special about keeping a physical journal and I would strongly recommend you keep your journal physically. For one, if you are taking it into nature and into sacred spaces with you, the last thing you want is an electronic device in those spaces. The screens have a way of pulling you away and into them rather into the space. If the purpose of the journal is to record words, I would suggest using old-fashioned methods.

 

On the outside: If you are going to go with a purchased journal, You want a journal that lays flat, that is enjoyable to write in, and that is well constructed.  One place to look is on Etsy and similar places and seeing if you can purchase a nice journal that was handmade with care and love.  You’ll support an artist and also have a wonderful journal.   Some journal makers (especially those working in leather) can make a journal cover that you can then replace the insides. This means that you could buy one journal + cover, and then when you are done, put the cover on a new journal and keep going, placing the old journal on your shelf. This is a nice option and represents a limited investment.

 

On the Inside: One of my very early spiritual journals was a simple affair, but homemade. I began by purchasing some hot press, low quality watercolor paper and folding them in half, making signatures. I bound the journal using a Coptic stitch technique with two boards. Then, in each of the pages, I did a simple watercolor wash. The watercolor pages dried and then, when I opened the journal, I had a variety of colorful surfaces on which to write.

My first dedicated spiritual journal (made when I joined the AODA)

My first dedicated spiritual journal (made when I joined the AODA)

You can do the same thing with cheap watercolors and any journal designed for multiple media or mixed media (these are readily available in arts and craft stores). These kinds of journals will be thicker and contain less pages, but will be sturdy and wonderful for colorful washes and bold printing.

[…]

 

Source: On Keeping a Spiritual Journal | The Druid’s Garden

Working with Fire Medicine (to Fuel Your Purpose) – Amy Brucker

 

 

I once dreamed a volcano was erupting and lava was pouring down the side of the mountain. Afraid, I ran toward the sea to find safety, but quickly realized there was no escape.

I had to choose between death by fire and death by water. Some choice. I woke up feeling trapped and indecisive.

When I told my shaman teacher my dream, she said, “For you, death by fire.”

But death by fire seemed like a scary path and I didn’t really know what that meant.

I suspected it meant leaping into the unknown and engaging my purpose with a firey passion while living from my most authentic self in a bigger way than I’d ever done before.

I didn’t know how to do that or what it would look like, so I didn’t really choose.

Instead I slipped into a “death by water” life that was a slow and lingering transformation.

That dream happened ten years ago, and although I eventually made it through the transformation, I regret, at least a little, not consciously choosing death by fire. I suspect I would be much further along on my path if I had.

What is Fire Medicine​

The sun rising in the eastern sky is a fireball that promises new beginnings. It transforms night into day by radiating light. That’s fire medicine.​

In my dream priestessing work, fire is the medicine of springtime, and with it comes the flames of creative visioning and transformation. ​

Fire medicine is potent stuff. ​It ignites your creative spark, fueling the passion you need to manifest your desires.

Yet like all medicine, too much can become toxic, and unless you know how to work with fire medicine, you can quickly go from feeling “on fire” to burning out.

So how do you develop your own fire medicine in healthy ways so you can tend the flame of your heart’s desire? That’s what this post is all about.

Understanding Fire Medicine in Your Life

Imagine a campfire. Too much fire and you burn down the entire forest. Not enough fire and you feel lifeless and cold. Just the right amount and you have warmth that can feed you and keep you cozy.

The same is true with fire medicine as it relates to your passion. (Your passion is just one expression of fire medicine.)

“Just Right” Fire…

When you’re like Goldilocks and you’ve discovered the “just right” amounts of fire you feel engaged, enthusiastic, and healthfully committed to your purpose. You have the Divine force you need to maintain momentum and burn through any fear you encounter. Nothing can get in your way, but you’re open-minded enough to explore your options to find the best path for your purpose.

Not Enough Fire…

If you’re feeling lifeless and disconnected from things that interest you, you probably don’t have enough fire in your life to feel enthusiastic. If this is happening, it’s useful to figure out what’s holding back the heat.

Too much water or emotion can drown out passion. Empaths who feel the emotion of the world may be too heavily doused in water for their fire medicine to work properly, leaving them unmotivated or uninspired.

Too much air or mental energy can cause you to “outthink” your passion. People who overthink things or who are too fact oriented may miss opportunities to leap because they are weighing the pros and cons to a fault. (Facts are not the problem. Attachment to them is.)

Too much earth or physical weight can keep you rigid and inflexible. People who are too grounded can become set in their ways, causing them to miss opportunities for growth because they are too comfortable where they are (and likely too afraid to grow). Inertia can set in making movement toward soul growth feel like a hassle.

Too Much Fire…

When you have too much fire, though, you create different kinds of problems.

When you become so passionate about something or someone that you become obsessed you can miss out on other areas of life. It’s like when people fall in love for the first time and they’re all over one another, never doing anything without the other person, and forgetting that there’s a whole world around them. This is a sign of too much fire. If it only lasts a little while it’s fun, but if it lasts too long it can cloud your judgement. If it continues it can lead to obsession and then it becomes unhealthy for you and possibly those around you.

Proselytizing is another sign of too much fire. Believing that your way is the best way, no matter what, denies the unique expression and potential of other people’s authentic connection with their soul path.

People who think everyone should eat a certain diet (e.g. be vegan, paleo, carnivore) and who preach about it in a way that tries to guilt people or convert them to their way of being is an unhealthy form of proselytizing that denies the greater truth that there is no one right way, and this is an expression of too much fire. A person can be enthusiastic, which means “in God” without proselytizing.

Rage is a a form of passion that is rooted in extreme and unrelenting anger. It has the characteristics of an uncontrolled forest fire. Anger is healthy, but rage, left unhealed, can turn everything around it into ash. It destroys health and relationships, and leaves the raging person feeling more disconnected to their purpose (and others) than connected.

How to Work with Fire Medicine When you Don’t have Enough

One of the biggest reasons people lose touch with their fire is that they get caught up in “shoulds” instead of “soul.”

What are you saying “no” to in your life? Are you saying “no” to something because you feel it would cost too much time, money, or resources? Or that if you said “yes” it would cost you a relationship?

Whenever you say “no” to something you long to say “yes” to, you diminish your fire medicine and you start to feel disconnected from your purpose.

The longer you do this, the more likely you are to forget what it was you wanted to say yes to, making it much more difficult to remember what you felt passionate about in the first place.

If this is you, the best place to start is with your dreams. Ask your dreams to help remind you what it is you love and to show you what’s getting in the way.

How to Work with Fire Medicine When you Have Too Much

There is a fine line between “just right” and “proselytizing” or “obsession.”

When you are “just right” you see that what you love is good medicine for you because it empowers you. From this place sharing is magnetic and loving, not just for you, but for the people who are receiving your sharing.

The second you start to believe and/or tell people that your way is the best and only way for everyone, you’ve crossed the line. When you start to “guilt trip” others because they aren’t doing what you think they should be doing you’ve crossed the line. At this point, your fire medicine might get out of control and the object or subject of your recipient may become engulfed in the flames of judgment, causing them to burn and turn into ash. It’s not pretty.

It’s easy to do this when you’re super passionate about something. I’ve done it myself many times, so if you’ve done this you’re not alone. There are at least two of us!

But here’s the thing: it’s only a problem if you stay rooted in that mindset, continue to badger the person on the receiving end, and stop paying attention to the negative consequences of your words and actions.

The key to rebalancing and stepping back into “good medicine” is to take a deep breath and to remind yourself that there is no one right way. That is an illusion fed to you by your ego.

Your “truth” is not necessarily Universal Truth and right for someone else. We each have our own unique relationship with our body, mind, soul, and Spirit, and you can trust that each person’s path is right for them, even if you disagree.

Prescriptions for Beautiful Fire Medicine

When I work with my clients I help address and heal core ancestral wounds that are interfering with balanced fire medicine. Together we usually find a point in the lineage during which a drama or trauma occurred to shift a healthy balance into a “wound” that perpetuates and grows as it’s passed down through the lineage.

As we work together I listen to the words they use as well as the feelings they experience and from these I create a “remedy” or “prescription” that might include dreamwork, flower essences, herbal teas, essential oils, or journal writing, all of which are intended to help them move through their “wound” so they can create permanent transformation.

Here are a few examples of what I might “prescribe” if there is a fire medicine imbalance. (Keep in mind that remedies and prescriptions are tailored to each individual. What’s right for one person is not necessarily right for another.)

Dreamwork

Dream incubation is one of my favorite ways to find direction and you can read about it here.

Flower Essence

Not enough fire: 

Tansy is for people who are suppressing their purpose due to indecision or lethargy.

Too much fire: 

Vervain is for people who experience intense enthusiasm and are trying to convert others to their belief system. This flower essence helps instill moderation.

What’s your relationship with fire medicine?

Are you feeling balanced?

Or do you need to realign?

Whatever your situation, spend some time this month feeling grateful for the fire in your life. Greet the sun in the morning. Stand in the warm rays for five minutes. Let the fire fill you with visions and help you transform them into reality.

sweet dreams,

Amy

About the Author: Amy Brucker

I help strong, successful women walk in two worlds at once–spiritual and earthly– so they can lead from their soul, live their magic out loud, and create lasting transformation for themselves and their clients. Want to see if we’re a good fit to work together? Set up a FREE Soulful Self Recalibration Session and we’ll find out! Discovery Session.

Source: Working with Fire Medicine (to Fuel Your Purpose) – Amy

Shadow Work Mega-Masterpost – Into The Deep

Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part IV: Slow Movements and Slow Spirituality | The Druid’s Garden

When I lived in Michigan, each Christmas, a local church just down the road from me put on a drive-by nativity scene. Cars full of people would line up for over half a mile and drive around this circular loop surrounding the church, where church members dressed up and enacted various kinds of nativity scenes.  I’m sure from the perspective of the church (who, clearly, invested a lot of time and resources, taking weeks to build the sets in the bitter cold in the time leading up to the event), it was a way to reach people who might otherwise not come through the church doors.  This same church also offered “speedy sermons” and other “quick” ways of getting busy people in the door. The idea behind these different initiatives was reaching out to people who were otherwise too busy to come to church–a reasonable and rather creative thing to do, given the time crunch everyone seems to be in these days. But for all that was gained (new members, new donations, etc) what was lost in the process of converting religion into a drive-through experience? Of course, just like the burger at McDonald’s vs. the burger you grill at home with time and care, there are likely some big differences not only in taste but also in presentation, nutrition, and energy.

 

In my last three posts in “Slowing Down the Druid Way”, we explored the history of time and our relationship to our working hours, and how we might begin to honor our time more fully.  This directly leads me to the topic of my final post on time and work: looking at the slow movements as a way of slowing down, making slowing down a conscious choice, and embracing leisure time.

 

The “Slow” Movements

The term “slow” has been increasingly used to describe many of the movements connected to sustainable living: you might have heard of slow food (as opposed to fast food or industrialized food) or slow money (in terms of investing, saving, and spending and in opposition to current derivatives/investment market).  We now also have slow schools, slow books, and even (in my own field) discussion of slow writing! The slow movement has, in fact, been around since the 1980’s; it was started by Carlo Petrini, who protested the opening of the “fast” food joint, McDonalds, in Rome, Italy. Since then, the movement has spread and deepened, connecting now to all aspects of life: travel, food, parenting, education, working, gardening, and more. Of course, you won’t see any discussion of this movement in mainstream culture–mainstream culture, here in the US, is focused on the idea that more and faster is better, and that kind of thinking takes some time to overcome.

 

A good slowing down spot!

A good slowing down spot!

The slow movements suggest that we are all the victims of “time poverty” and the slow movements are deliberate attempts by people to live at a reasonable pace (rather than a frantic one).  But these movements are more than just about slowing down–they recognize inherently that the faster we move, the fewer connections we make: with ourselves, with each other, with our creative gifts, and with the world as a whole.  So let’s now explore some of these slow movements and what they provide.

 

Nature Spirituality and Slow Spirituality

I’m going to start by introducing my own kind of “slow” movement: slow spirituality.  Cultivating a deeper relationship with time is certainly a principle that seems inherent in the druid traditions and in related nature-spiritual traditions. Anyone following the wheel of the year is certainly concerned a tremendous amount with time: the eight holidays on the wheel of the year are all about timing and the sun and it’s slow movement across the sky.  The phases of the moon reflect this on a monthly cycle. We focus on the interplay of light and dark, the slow changing of the seasons, the minute changes from day to day of weather patterns.  All of this takes observation and interaction with nature and a lot of time dedicated to understanding this larger cycle of the seasons.  Sure, there are ways of going about these practices that are “fast”, but moving fast means you miss most of the important pieces. In the AODA, for example, we ask that all members spend weekly time in nature, daily time in meditation, and time just observing and interacting with the world. This time is critical–and it is through these activities that deepest understandings are often cultivated.

 

In fact, I think part of the reason that so many people are drawn to meditation, ritual and other druid practices is that it offers a way to slow down and change pace. The more time you spend with these practices, the deeper they will go and the richer the rewards will be.  There is much room for exploration in linking the slow movements to the druid tradition and key practices within it. […]

Rest of the story at its Source: Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part IV: Slow Movements and Slow Spirituality | The Druid’s Garden

Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea Blend for a Cold – Good Witches Homestead

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Got a cold, sick in bed? Find relief and comfort with this simple tea blend using 3 common culinary herbs.

 

 When down with a cold, a hot cup of tea can go a long way. But it can be hard to take care of ourselves when we feel lousy. Grogginess, grumpiness, and exhaustion can overwhelm our capabilities for self-care. That’s why I often recommend this totally simple (yet very effective) herbal tea that makes use of some readily available kitchen herbs.

Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea blend for a cold 

  • 2 teaspoons thyme leaf
  • 2 teaspoons sage leaf
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds – gently broken up in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder

Use high quality, organic herbs. If you’re a cook, you’ll probably have these herbs on hand in your spice rack. Put the herbs into a medium sized teapot or jar. Pour 2 cups freshly boiled water over the herbs, and cover. Let infuse for 10 – 15 minutes. This tea must be covered while steeping, to preserve the medicinal volatile oils in the plants. Strain and pour into your tea cup.  Add 1/2 – 1 teaspoon honey, if desired. Re-steep the herbs with more hot water for another brew. After 2 batches, start again with fresh herbs.

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Entire article at the Source: Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea Blend for a Cold – Good Witches Homestead

Slowing Down the Druid Way: Part III: Time-Honoring Strategies | The Druid’s Garden

This past week, a friend and I were discussing options for starting seeds for a new joint major gardening project (more on that in an upcoming post).  We talked about several options, and deciding we wanted to stay away from plastic ready-made planting pots, opted for a paper pot maker (a little wooden device that makes it stunningly easy to create paper pots from recycled newspaper). This choice, of course, is an excellent one from a permaculture perspective: it takes an extremely abundant waste product and turns it into a resource. Of course, in order to make these pots, you need the time to collect the paper and the time to create them. This simple choice–paper or plastic–along with the investment of time illustrates an underlying principle that seems to me to be near-universally true in my experience: the further away from fossil fuels we get, the more time things take. And here, of course, is the crux of this entire blog post series: if we want to do anything beyond our work (practicing permaculture, developing deep relationships with the land, developing bardic arts, or whatever it is we want to accomplish), we have to find the time to do so.

Starting seeds in recycled materials

In my previous two blog posts, I explored the nature of work both historically and in the present age, which helped illuminate some of the current unbalances we have with our work–and opened up the door for us to consider revisiting our relationship to it. And it is this spirit that today, I talk about re-negotiating and re-envisioning our relationship to work and hence, to our time. As I explored over the last two weeks, historical data suggests that we worked a lot less in ages past, which allowed for more leisure time, feasting, merriment, and the learning of crafts and skills. It also gave our ancestors the necessary time to live without fossil fuels–to do work slower, with more intention, and live at a different pace. In the present age, our time is owned by our employers and continued increases in productivity have occurred with increases in work hours, meaning that we are working more than ever before.  It seems that, in some cases, fossil fuels and the myth of progress is speeding us up so much–and most of sustainable living practices focus in the opposite direction. The tension between them is many things, but one of them is certainly time and different ways of working.

[…]

Entirety of article at the Source: Slowing Down the Druid Way: Part III: Time-Honoring Strategies | The Druid’s Garden

Secondary Effects of a Reiki Session – Holistic Experiment

In the field of alternative medicine, Reiki is used to help bolster one’s own healing abilities to cure all manner of maladies. Although it’s typically said that there is no side effects involved with Reiki, the practitioners are taught to warn patients that part of the healing process can involve a detox that can bring some side effects

A full body treatment takes from 45 to 60 minutes per session, a short session that only focuses on the chakras lasts 15 to 30 minutes. Sometimes the person who is receiving Reiki will  not feel anything during a session, this is because Reiki energy often works on a subtle level.

No matter what, Reiki energy always travels to the place that is needed the most, but it’s essential to understand that healing is a process. Reiki does not fix depression, anxiety, or aches and pain with just one session, just like it take a long time to cure a cold using conventional medicine, it takes time to heal.

The most common reactions during a Reiki session are: feeling emotional, hot or cold, seeing colors or light, twitching, stomach rumbles, and even falling asleep during the session. Every body is different, so every reaction is going to be unique, just make sure if you’re feeling uncomfortable during a session, inform the practitioner immediately.

Other commonly experienced side effects are: cold and sore throat, fever, abdominal pain or an upset stomach, fatigue and the need to sleep, less energy, feeling lightheaded, sensations in different parts of the body (often in the head and heart), and major life changes in relationships, career, locations, etc.

It’s often recommended to drink lots of water and rest as soon as you get Reiki because you might be feeling a bit tired. If you can, don’t drive to your appointment, or better yet, find a practitioner that can go to your home or take a distance healing session so that you can take a nice nap after the session.

A lot of people will notice that after this process takes its course, they start experiencing the happy side effects of Reiki. This happens because every single time we heal, we release one layer of darkness from our auras and our body’s blueprint. The body will slowly flush out the toxicity that is stored in our cells in order to pave the way for a healthier and happier lifestyle.

So next time you experience a side effect after a healing session, drink lots of water, rest, and welcome the side effects!

Source: Secondary Effects of a Reiki Session – Holistic Experiment

How to Cope When You Feel Disconnected

This article struck a cord with me as I experienced the same thing after my hip replacement … Paula Cas

We all have moments when we feel a little bit off or just not quite in tune with our spirituality, intuition, or inner voice.  But what do we do when we feel completely disconnected for days or weeks at a time?

Unlike those small “off” moments, which can be triggered by relatively innocuous things like annoyance, brief lack of confidence, or just a plain old bad day, disconnection generally has larger roots.  Grief, depression, serious illness, surgery*, and new medications are all things that can and do vastly affect us on physical, emotional, and metaphysical levels.  But in these instances, knowing the cause isn’t necessarily helpful, as they are not circumstances that we can easily change.

So, what do we do?

The big answer—and the one I most often have trouble with—is patience.  Like any other mental or emotional blockage, very often it’s just something your body and mind have to work their way through.  But “be patient” is terrible advice, right?  You are already stressed, it’s like telling you to calm down.  So, here are a few things to try while you’re waiting:

Continue with routine as soon as possible
The causes that landed us in this state are also often things that disrupt our lives anyway.  The quicker that you can get back to some semblance of your “normal” life, the better.

Create new rituals
Whether you can continue with routine or not, maybe you need something new.  Here we want simple daily things that are not strenuous or time consuming.  Try something like ending each night writing down one thing that went well, or one thing you are grateful for.  Or lighting a candle for a cause that you believe in, or a person/people you’d like to help.

Practice meditation
In whatever way works for you (we have some tips on that).  If it allows you to feel something, great!  If not, hopefully it helps a bit with the relaxation you almost assuredly need.

Make time for fun
This one can be hard, I know.  But, as hokey as it sounds, your inner child does need a chance to roam.  And play is so important, for all creatures.  If you are physically able, a hike or even a short walk in nature can do wonders, and in the spirit of play I am rarely one to say no to a turn on a swing set.  You might also try having coffee or lunch with friends, or simply chatting on the phone or over text.  If being social isn’t your thing (or it’s too taxing due to the current situation), maybe you could splurge on a new book you’d been wanting to read, borrow a favorite from the library (e-books, looove), or veg out in front of the tv with that series you’ve been meaning to watch.

Don’t force it
Not yourself, nor any of these suggestions.   I can’t emphasize this enough.  Do. Not. Force. It.  You might be tempted to bargain or make deals—“If I do this every day, I’ll be back to normal a month and a day from now.”—don’t.  Added pressure will likely only make things worse.  We all heal at different rates and in different ways.  And as much as this might not feel like healing, I assure you, it is.

Remember that all things are cyclical.  You may feel lost, maybe even like you’ve veered off the path and cannot see a way through.  But if all of life is a circle, eventually the fog has to clear, and you will find your way back.

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*For the sake of clarity, disclosure, and all of that soul-baring fun(?) stuff, here’s a bit of personal insight from Melankalia:

I had surgery two weeks ago.  For the first time.  Out-patient, all went as expected (barring something of a major panic-attack coming out of anesthesia, NOT fun), recovery, healing, and physical therapy are all going well.  All good things.

But I feel weird.  There are mobility issues, the pain meds are not quite agreeing with me, and my stamina is sort of laughable, but these are things I expected and accounted for.  What I did not expect was to feel so very disconnected metaphysically, and (somewhat) emotionally.  I don’t know if it’s the physical trauma of surgery, a sensitivity to the new foreign bodies embedded in my flesh, lingering effects of being flooded with various medications, or just some chaotic out-of-whack result of all of the above.  But I just don’t feel….right.  My intuition, the “voices in my head”, my connection to deities and to nature all feel muted.  And now I am just biding my time…and trying to take my own advice.

But, I know, or at least I believe, that in time I’ll be feeling more me again.  And if you’re reading this, and struggling, I believe that eventually you will be okay again, too.

Source: How to Cope When You Feel Disconnected | Witchery Wednesday