Working with Fire Medicine (to Fuel Your Purpose) – Amy Brucker

 

 

I once dreamed a volcano was erupting and lava was pouring down the side of the mountain. Afraid, I ran toward the sea to find safety, but quickly realized there was no escape.

I had to choose between death by fire and death by water. Some choice. I woke up feeling trapped and indecisive.

When I told my shaman teacher my dream, she said, “For you, death by fire.”

But death by fire seemed like a scary path and I didn’t really know what that meant.

I suspected it meant leaping into the unknown and engaging my purpose with a firey passion while living from my most authentic self in a bigger way than I’d ever done before.

I didn’t know how to do that or what it would look like, so I didn’t really choose.

Instead I slipped into a “death by water” life that was a slow and lingering transformation.

That dream happened ten years ago, and although I eventually made it through the transformation, I regret, at least a little, not consciously choosing death by fire. I suspect I would be much further along on my path if I had.

What is Fire Medicine​

The sun rising in the eastern sky is a fireball that promises new beginnings. It transforms night into day by radiating light. That’s fire medicine.​

In my dream priestessing work, fire is the medicine of springtime, and with it comes the flames of creative visioning and transformation. ​

Fire medicine is potent stuff. ​It ignites your creative spark, fueling the passion you need to manifest your desires.

Yet like all medicine, too much can become toxic, and unless you know how to work with fire medicine, you can quickly go from feeling “on fire” to burning out.

So how do you develop your own fire medicine in healthy ways so you can tend the flame of your heart’s desire? That’s what this post is all about.

Understanding Fire Medicine in Your Life

Imagine a campfire. Too much fire and you burn down the entire forest. Not enough fire and you feel lifeless and cold. Just the right amount and you have warmth that can feed you and keep you cozy.

The same is true with fire medicine as it relates to your passion. (Your passion is just one expression of fire medicine.)

“Just Right” Fire…

When you’re like Goldilocks and you’ve discovered the “just right” amounts of fire you feel engaged, enthusiastic, and healthfully committed to your purpose. You have the Divine force you need to maintain momentum and burn through any fear you encounter. Nothing can get in your way, but you’re open-minded enough to explore your options to find the best path for your purpose.

Not Enough Fire…

If you’re feeling lifeless and disconnected from things that interest you, you probably don’t have enough fire in your life to feel enthusiastic. If this is happening, it’s useful to figure out what’s holding back the heat.

Too much water or emotion can drown out passion. Empaths who feel the emotion of the world may be too heavily doused in water for their fire medicine to work properly, leaving them unmotivated or uninspired.

Too much air or mental energy can cause you to “outthink” your passion. People who overthink things or who are too fact oriented may miss opportunities to leap because they are weighing the pros and cons to a fault. (Facts are not the problem. Attachment to them is.)

Too much earth or physical weight can keep you rigid and inflexible. People who are too grounded can become set in their ways, causing them to miss opportunities for growth because they are too comfortable where they are (and likely too afraid to grow). Inertia can set in making movement toward soul growth feel like a hassle.

Too Much Fire…

When you have too much fire, though, you create different kinds of problems.

When you become so passionate about something or someone that you become obsessed you can miss out on other areas of life. It’s like when people fall in love for the first time and they’re all over one another, never doing anything without the other person, and forgetting that there’s a whole world around them. This is a sign of too much fire. If it only lasts a little while it’s fun, but if it lasts too long it can cloud your judgement. If it continues it can lead to obsession and then it becomes unhealthy for you and possibly those around you.

Proselytizing is another sign of too much fire. Believing that your way is the best way, no matter what, denies the unique expression and potential of other people’s authentic connection with their soul path.

People who think everyone should eat a certain diet (e.g. be vegan, paleo, carnivore) and who preach about it in a way that tries to guilt people or convert them to their way of being is an unhealthy form of proselytizing that denies the greater truth that there is no one right way, and this is an expression of too much fire. A person can be enthusiastic, which means “in God” without proselytizing.

Rage is a a form of passion that is rooted in extreme and unrelenting anger. It has the characteristics of an uncontrolled forest fire. Anger is healthy, but rage, left unhealed, can turn everything around it into ash. It destroys health and relationships, and leaves the raging person feeling more disconnected to their purpose (and others) than connected.

How to Work with Fire Medicine When you Don’t have Enough

One of the biggest reasons people lose touch with their fire is that they get caught up in “shoulds” instead of “soul.”

What are you saying “no” to in your life? Are you saying “no” to something because you feel it would cost too much time, money, or resources? Or that if you said “yes” it would cost you a relationship?

Whenever you say “no” to something you long to say “yes” to, you diminish your fire medicine and you start to feel disconnected from your purpose.

The longer you do this, the more likely you are to forget what it was you wanted to say yes to, making it much more difficult to remember what you felt passionate about in the first place.

If this is you, the best place to start is with your dreams. Ask your dreams to help remind you what it is you love and to show you what’s getting in the way.

How to Work with Fire Medicine When you Have Too Much

There is a fine line between “just right” and “proselytizing” or “obsession.”

When you are “just right” you see that what you love is good medicine for you because it empowers you. From this place sharing is magnetic and loving, not just for you, but for the people who are receiving your sharing.

The second you start to believe and/or tell people that your way is the best and only way for everyone, you’ve crossed the line. When you start to “guilt trip” others because they aren’t doing what you think they should be doing you’ve crossed the line. At this point, your fire medicine might get out of control and the object or subject of your recipient may become engulfed in the flames of judgment, causing them to burn and turn into ash. It’s not pretty.

It’s easy to do this when you’re super passionate about something. I’ve done it myself many times, so if you’ve done this you’re not alone. There are at least two of us!

But here’s the thing: it’s only a problem if you stay rooted in that mindset, continue to badger the person on the receiving end, and stop paying attention to the negative consequences of your words and actions.

The key to rebalancing and stepping back into “good medicine” is to take a deep breath and to remind yourself that there is no one right way. That is an illusion fed to you by your ego.

Your “truth” is not necessarily Universal Truth and right for someone else. We each have our own unique relationship with our body, mind, soul, and Spirit, and you can trust that each person’s path is right for them, even if you disagree.

Prescriptions for Beautiful Fire Medicine

When I work with my clients I help address and heal core ancestral wounds that are interfering with balanced fire medicine. Together we usually find a point in the lineage during which a drama or trauma occurred to shift a healthy balance into a “wound” that perpetuates and grows as it’s passed down through the lineage.

As we work together I listen to the words they use as well as the feelings they experience and from these I create a “remedy” or “prescription” that might include dreamwork, flower essences, herbal teas, essential oils, or journal writing, all of which are intended to help them move through their “wound” so they can create permanent transformation.

Here are a few examples of what I might “prescribe” if there is a fire medicine imbalance. (Keep in mind that remedies and prescriptions are tailored to each individual. What’s right for one person is not necessarily right for another.)

Dreamwork

Dream incubation is one of my favorite ways to find direction and you can read about it here.

Flower Essence

Not enough fire: 

Tansy is for people who are suppressing their purpose due to indecision or lethargy.

Too much fire: 

Vervain is for people who experience intense enthusiasm and are trying to convert others to their belief system. This flower essence helps instill moderation.

What’s your relationship with fire medicine?

Are you feeling balanced?

Or do you need to realign?

Whatever your situation, spend some time this month feeling grateful for the fire in your life. Greet the sun in the morning. Stand in the warm rays for five minutes. Let the fire fill you with visions and help you transform them into reality.

sweet dreams,

Amy

About the Author: Amy Brucker

I help strong, successful women walk in two worlds at once–spiritual and earthly– so they can lead from their soul, live their magic out loud, and create lasting transformation for themselves and their clients. Want to see if we’re a good fit to work together? Set up a FREE Soulful Self Recalibration Session and we’ll find out! Discovery Session.

Source: Working with Fire Medicine (to Fuel Your Purpose) – Amy

Shadow Work Mega-Masterpost – Into The Deep

Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part IV: Slow Movements and Slow Spirituality | The Druid’s Garden

When I lived in Michigan, each Christmas, a local church just down the road from me put on a drive-by nativity scene. Cars full of people would line up for over half a mile and drive around this circular loop surrounding the church, where church members dressed up and enacted various kinds of nativity scenes.  I’m sure from the perspective of the church (who, clearly, invested a lot of time and resources, taking weeks to build the sets in the bitter cold in the time leading up to the event), it was a way to reach people who might otherwise not come through the church doors.  This same church also offered “speedy sermons” and other “quick” ways of getting busy people in the door. The idea behind these different initiatives was reaching out to people who were otherwise too busy to come to church–a reasonable and rather creative thing to do, given the time crunch everyone seems to be in these days. But for all that was gained (new members, new donations, etc) what was lost in the process of converting religion into a drive-through experience? Of course, just like the burger at McDonald’s vs. the burger you grill at home with time and care, there are likely some big differences not only in taste but also in presentation, nutrition, and energy.

 

In my last three posts in “Slowing Down the Druid Way”, we explored the history of time and our relationship to our working hours, and how we might begin to honor our time more fully.  This directly leads me to the topic of my final post on time and work: looking at the slow movements as a way of slowing down, making slowing down a conscious choice, and embracing leisure time.

 

The “Slow” Movements

The term “slow” has been increasingly used to describe many of the movements connected to sustainable living: you might have heard of slow food (as opposed to fast food or industrialized food) or slow money (in terms of investing, saving, and spending and in opposition to current derivatives/investment market).  We now also have slow schools, slow books, and even (in my own field) discussion of slow writing! The slow movement has, in fact, been around since the 1980’s; it was started by Carlo Petrini, who protested the opening of the “fast” food joint, McDonalds, in Rome, Italy. Since then, the movement has spread and deepened, connecting now to all aspects of life: travel, food, parenting, education, working, gardening, and more. Of course, you won’t see any discussion of this movement in mainstream culture–mainstream culture, here in the US, is focused on the idea that more and faster is better, and that kind of thinking takes some time to overcome.

 

A good slowing down spot!

A good slowing down spot!

The slow movements suggest that we are all the victims of “time poverty” and the slow movements are deliberate attempts by people to live at a reasonable pace (rather than a frantic one).  But these movements are more than just about slowing down–they recognize inherently that the faster we move, the fewer connections we make: with ourselves, with each other, with our creative gifts, and with the world as a whole.  So let’s now explore some of these slow movements and what they provide.

 

Nature Spirituality and Slow Spirituality

I’m going to start by introducing my own kind of “slow” movement: slow spirituality.  Cultivating a deeper relationship with time is certainly a principle that seems inherent in the druid traditions and in related nature-spiritual traditions. Anyone following the wheel of the year is certainly concerned a tremendous amount with time: the eight holidays on the wheel of the year are all about timing and the sun and it’s slow movement across the sky.  The phases of the moon reflect this on a monthly cycle. We focus on the interplay of light and dark, the slow changing of the seasons, the minute changes from day to day of weather patterns.  All of this takes observation and interaction with nature and a lot of time dedicated to understanding this larger cycle of the seasons.  Sure, there are ways of going about these practices that are “fast”, but moving fast means you miss most of the important pieces. In the AODA, for example, we ask that all members spend weekly time in nature, daily time in meditation, and time just observing and interacting with the world. This time is critical–and it is through these activities that deepest understandings are often cultivated.

 

In fact, I think part of the reason that so many people are drawn to meditation, ritual and other druid practices is that it offers a way to slow down and change pace. The more time you spend with these practices, the deeper they will go and the richer the rewards will be.  There is much room for exploration in linking the slow movements to the druid tradition and key practices within it. […]

Rest of the story at its Source: Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part IV: Slow Movements and Slow Spirituality | The Druid’s Garden

Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea Blend for a Cold – Good Witches Homestead

tea-blog-header

Got a cold, sick in bed? Find relief and comfort with this simple tea blend using 3 common culinary herbs.

 

 When down with a cold, a hot cup of tea can go a long way. But it can be hard to take care of ourselves when we feel lousy. Grogginess, grumpiness, and exhaustion can overwhelm our capabilities for self-care. That’s why I often recommend this totally simple (yet very effective) herbal tea that makes use of some readily available kitchen herbs.

Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea blend for a cold 

  • 2 teaspoons thyme leaf
  • 2 teaspoons sage leaf
  • 2 teaspoons fennel seeds – gently broken up in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder

Use high quality, organic herbs. If you’re a cook, you’ll probably have these herbs on hand in your spice rack. Put the herbs into a medium sized teapot or jar. Pour 2 cups freshly boiled water over the herbs, and cover. Let infuse for 10 – 15 minutes. This tea must be covered while steeping, to preserve the medicinal volatile oils in the plants. Strain and pour into your tea cup.  Add 1/2 – 1 teaspoon honey, if desired. Re-steep the herbs with more hot water for another brew. After 2 batches, start again with fresh herbs.

[…]

Entire article at the Source: Kitchen Cabinet Medicine – Tea Blend for a Cold – Good Witches Homestead

Slowing Down the Druid Way: Part III: Time-Honoring Strategies | The Druid’s Garden

This past week, a friend and I were discussing options for starting seeds for a new joint major gardening project (more on that in an upcoming post).  We talked about several options, and deciding we wanted to stay away from plastic ready-made planting pots, opted for a paper pot maker (a little wooden device that makes it stunningly easy to create paper pots from recycled newspaper). This choice, of course, is an excellent one from a permaculture perspective: it takes an extremely abundant waste product and turns it into a resource. Of course, in order to make these pots, you need the time to collect the paper and the time to create them. This simple choice–paper or plastic–along with the investment of time illustrates an underlying principle that seems to me to be near-universally true in my experience: the further away from fossil fuels we get, the more time things take. And here, of course, is the crux of this entire blog post series: if we want to do anything beyond our work (practicing permaculture, developing deep relationships with the land, developing bardic arts, or whatever it is we want to accomplish), we have to find the time to do so.

Starting seeds in recycled materials

In my previous two blog posts, I explored the nature of work both historically and in the present age, which helped illuminate some of the current unbalances we have with our work–and opened up the door for us to consider revisiting our relationship to it. And it is this spirit that today, I talk about re-negotiating and re-envisioning our relationship to work and hence, to our time. As I explored over the last two weeks, historical data suggests that we worked a lot less in ages past, which allowed for more leisure time, feasting, merriment, and the learning of crafts and skills. It also gave our ancestors the necessary time to live without fossil fuels–to do work slower, with more intention, and live at a different pace. In the present age, our time is owned by our employers and continued increases in productivity have occurred with increases in work hours, meaning that we are working more than ever before.  It seems that, in some cases, fossil fuels and the myth of progress is speeding us up so much–and most of sustainable living practices focus in the opposite direction. The tension between them is many things, but one of them is certainly time and different ways of working.

[…]

Entirety of article at the Source: Slowing Down the Druid Way: Part III: Time-Honoring Strategies | The Druid’s Garden

Secondary Effects of a Reiki Session – Holistic Experiment

In the field of alternative medicine, Reiki is used to help bolster one’s own healing abilities to cure all manner of maladies. Although it’s typically said that there is no side effects involved with Reiki, the practitioners are taught to warn patients that part of the healing process can involve a detox that can bring some side effects

A full body treatment takes from 45 to 60 minutes per session, a short session that only focuses on the chakras lasts 15 to 30 minutes. Sometimes the person who is receiving Reiki will  not feel anything during a session, this is because Reiki energy often works on a subtle level.

No matter what, Reiki energy always travels to the place that is needed the most, but it’s essential to understand that healing is a process. Reiki does not fix depression, anxiety, or aches and pain with just one session, just like it take a long time to cure a cold using conventional medicine, it takes time to heal.

The most common reactions during a Reiki session are: feeling emotional, hot or cold, seeing colors or light, twitching, stomach rumbles, and even falling asleep during the session. Every body is different, so every reaction is going to be unique, just make sure if you’re feeling uncomfortable during a session, inform the practitioner immediately.

Other commonly experienced side effects are: cold and sore throat, fever, abdominal pain or an upset stomach, fatigue and the need to sleep, less energy, feeling lightheaded, sensations in different parts of the body (often in the head and heart), and major life changes in relationships, career, locations, etc.

It’s often recommended to drink lots of water and rest as soon as you get Reiki because you might be feeling a bit tired. If you can, don’t drive to your appointment, or better yet, find a practitioner that can go to your home or take a distance healing session so that you can take a nice nap after the session.

A lot of people will notice that after this process takes its course, they start experiencing the happy side effects of Reiki. This happens because every single time we heal, we release one layer of darkness from our auras and our body’s blueprint. The body will slowly flush out the toxicity that is stored in our cells in order to pave the way for a healthier and happier lifestyle.

So next time you experience a side effect after a healing session, drink lots of water, rest, and welcome the side effects!

Source: Secondary Effects of a Reiki Session – Holistic Experiment

How to Cope When You Feel Disconnected

This article struck a cord with me as I experienced the same thing after my hip replacement … Paula Cas

We all have moments when we feel a little bit off or just not quite in tune with our spirituality, intuition, or inner voice.  But what do we do when we feel completely disconnected for days or weeks at a time?

Unlike those small “off” moments, which can be triggered by relatively innocuous things like annoyance, brief lack of confidence, or just a plain old bad day, disconnection generally has larger roots.  Grief, depression, serious illness, surgery*, and new medications are all things that can and do vastly affect us on physical, emotional, and metaphysical levels.  But in these instances, knowing the cause isn’t necessarily helpful, as they are not circumstances that we can easily change.

So, what do we do?

The big answer—and the one I most often have trouble with—is patience.  Like any other mental or emotional blockage, very often it’s just something your body and mind have to work their way through.  But “be patient” is terrible advice, right?  You are already stressed, it’s like telling you to calm down.  So, here are a few things to try while you’re waiting:

Continue with routine as soon as possible
The causes that landed us in this state are also often things that disrupt our lives anyway.  The quicker that you can get back to some semblance of your “normal” life, the better.

Create new rituals
Whether you can continue with routine or not, maybe you need something new.  Here we want simple daily things that are not strenuous or time consuming.  Try something like ending each night writing down one thing that went well, or one thing you are grateful for.  Or lighting a candle for a cause that you believe in, or a person/people you’d like to help.

Practice meditation
In whatever way works for you (we have some tips on that).  If it allows you to feel something, great!  If not, hopefully it helps a bit with the relaxation you almost assuredly need.

Make time for fun
This one can be hard, I know.  But, as hokey as it sounds, your inner child does need a chance to roam.  And play is so important, for all creatures.  If you are physically able, a hike or even a short walk in nature can do wonders, and in the spirit of play I am rarely one to say no to a turn on a swing set.  You might also try having coffee or lunch with friends, or simply chatting on the phone or over text.  If being social isn’t your thing (or it’s too taxing due to the current situation), maybe you could splurge on a new book you’d been wanting to read, borrow a favorite from the library (e-books, looove), or veg out in front of the tv with that series you’ve been meaning to watch.

Don’t force it
Not yourself, nor any of these suggestions.   I can’t emphasize this enough.  Do. Not. Force. It.  You might be tempted to bargain or make deals—“If I do this every day, I’ll be back to normal a month and a day from now.”—don’t.  Added pressure will likely only make things worse.  We all heal at different rates and in different ways.  And as much as this might not feel like healing, I assure you, it is.

Remember that all things are cyclical.  You may feel lost, maybe even like you’ve veered off the path and cannot see a way through.  But if all of life is a circle, eventually the fog has to clear, and you will find your way back.

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*For the sake of clarity, disclosure, and all of that soul-baring fun(?) stuff, here’s a bit of personal insight from Melankalia:

I had surgery two weeks ago.  For the first time.  Out-patient, all went as expected (barring something of a major panic-attack coming out of anesthesia, NOT fun), recovery, healing, and physical therapy are all going well.  All good things.

But I feel weird.  There are mobility issues, the pain meds are not quite agreeing with me, and my stamina is sort of laughable, but these are things I expected and accounted for.  What I did not expect was to feel so very disconnected metaphysically, and (somewhat) emotionally.  I don’t know if it’s the physical trauma of surgery, a sensitivity to the new foreign bodies embedded in my flesh, lingering effects of being flooded with various medications, or just some chaotic out-of-whack result of all of the above.  But I just don’t feel….right.  My intuition, the “voices in my head”, my connection to deities and to nature all feel muted.  And now I am just biding my time…and trying to take my own advice.

But, I know, or at least I believe, that in time I’ll be feeling more me again.  And if you’re reading this, and struggling, I believe that eventually you will be okay again, too.

Source: How to Cope When You Feel Disconnected | Witchery Wednesday

Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part II: Relationships of Work and Time

In the US, it seems that the first question people ask is, “what do you do?”  When they say that, of course, they are not talking about how you spend your leisure time, but rather, the work that you do for pay. This is the most defining characteristic of modern lives–because this is tied to the thing our culture holds as most sacred: money.  Money is the only metric that has any real value and the pursuit of money drives all else. If you aren’t working in the workforce earning pay, either the work are doing is devalued (as any stay-at-home parent can attest) or there is something very wrong with you (as in, why aren’t you out there earning money?). This current economic system, driven by industrial mindsets surrounding profit and efficiency, gives us a rather poor metric through which to measure ourselves and our value. …

Source: Slowing Down the Druid Way, Part II: Relationships of Work and Time | The Druid’s Garden

How to Work with Your Shadow Self

sulamith-wulfing-german-artist-childrens-book-illustration-5

“One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious. The latter procedure, however, is disagreeable and therefore not popular.”― C.G. Jung

FEEDING THE SHADOW SELF

Disconnected from our empowerment the shadow (those unloved, unacknowledged parts of us) grows stronger and thrives on more of the same. Rather than interacting with life, we react. Reactionary living is acidic, corrosive and destructive. That is not to say we can live without reaction… It is a human response. It serves to keep us alert and alive. But, you can learn to interact with the world, befriending experience and still remaining safe.

First you must listen to the shadow.

Check Out: 4 Ways to Befriend Your Shadow-self to Find Your Truest Voice 

You may say, “Well how do I befriend my shadow?”  It’s simple, what are you afraid of? Go there. If you fear talking to strangers, take that feeling deeper and explore why. Maybe that’s why you’ve been unable to meet a partner. Maybe at your core you fear rejection. So take the power back, muster the strength and go talk to someone.

Be bold, be brave and step out there and walk the middle ground. Let your darkness show you something you never knew before, or never wanted to know. If you let it consume you, you become numb, you lose passion, and without passion nothing can live.

So you don’t know how to get past that anxiety. Leap before you think. In that in-between space is where passion lives. That is the instinctual part of you, devoid of ego and preconceived notions. You act from your center, where light and shadow come together like two great streams flowing into a river.

Begin asking, why?

Once you befriend your shadow parts, your pain, you find yourself dancing in the dark. You move into the sacred communion with your light and your shadow. Born of rhythm and fluidity. Because the shadow is not bad, rather it is the unwelcoming of the shadow that causes pain.

Take some time to express to your shadow all that you feel. Be open, honest and candied with your shadow. Express your deepest feelings of pain, disappointment and even resentment.

“What makes night within us may leave stars.” ― Victor HugoNinety-Three

What do you feel about your shadow? What has she done to you? Where have you felt held back in your life? What have you missed out on? Why, and how do you feel small in your life?

Openly express this to your Shadow self.

Check Out: The Alchemical Path of Expressing the Shadow 

LAYING YOUR GHOSTS TO REST

You have slipped into the Dark, and surrendered to her groove. Let her pulse through your heart, body and soul. You are losing old parts, and uncovering hidden ones. You are brave enough now for inner alchemy…Soul work!

In this dark, fertile place where transformation begins we must surrender ourselves to the experience. Which means we must move through our cycles of limiting thoughts, and crushing feelings… To get to the more inspired ones. You are detoxing from the high of resistant, fear based living.

“Intense, unexpected suffering passes more quickly than suffering that is apparently bearable; the latter goes on for years and, without our noticing, eats away at our souls, until, one day, we are no longer able to free ourselves from the bitterness and it stays with us for the rest of our lives.” ― Paulo CoelhoThe Alchemist

Now is the time for honesty. Come to terms with where you are inside and out. You do not have to be frightened anymore. Don’t deny yourself your sadness, or your rage. Just move into the feeling so that it can be cycled out and returned to the Earth, and the Universe as fertilizer for new intentions.

Check Out: Falling Curious, Finding Your Rhythm, and Making Peace with Your Ghosts 

MOVE INTO THE STORM OF YOUR SHADOW

After breathing into the chaos, the darkness… And asking these questions I find myself growing calmer, clearer and more able to move with the storm. The skies begin to brighten, and the world becomes more serene. My uncertainty and anxiety magnified the storm…. Because the Universe is a big mirror.

I like to move into the storm. Wrap myself in the water. And compassionately ask:

  • What do I have left to learn here?
  • How can I honor my highest good?

Check Out: Riding the Waves of Chaos and Confusion

WHERE TO GO FROM HERE?

Your shadow, your darkness, your forgotten hungry ghosts are your friends. They hold bright blessings and paths to healing. You have begun to cultivate awareness. Breathing life and sustenance into these arid, darkened places. Begin to cultivate daily time with yourself. Before the shadow can grow hungry and despondent… you can dialogue with the inner self to find what hurts, what feels wrong and what needs fixing.

The shadow is born when you allow something that opposes your goodness to become your truth!

Journal on the shadow. And your personal light.

Source: How to Work with Your Shadow Self | Shaheen Miro

Karelian Magic – Elder Mountain Dreaming

Various folk (shamanic) tradition practices are called Folk Healing, like the Grandmothers in this video (in other traditions its called medicine woman). The Slavs, Balkans and North regions like the Karelians pretty much have the same basic rituals for healing. The feet are important because they are both where the greatest amount of our detoxing of sickness releases.  The folk singing (chanting and/or spells its called in some traditions) are the direction in which the healing “intent” of the energy is given.

Song, movement, specific parts of the body, water and fire rituals, all work together as the root foundation, be that medicine chanted or spoken into sacred clothing through  embroidery, or the folk healer (who whisperers) a directional energy, or our relationship to the spirit (benevolent energies) of earth to work with the healer (in shamanic way), which is closest to our body and soul of the sick.

The Karelians are a nation that belongs to Baltic-Finnic ethnic group that are currently living in Finland and Russia. In Russia Karelians mostly settle in the Republic of Karelia and in other north-western parts of the Russian Federation. There are also significant Karelian enclaves in the Tver and Novgorod regions of Russia, as some Karelians migrated after 1656 because of war.

In Finland they traditionally settle in the regions of Savonia and Northern and Southern Karelia. The historic homeland of the Karelians has been the Karelian Isthmus, Ladoga Karelia, Olonets Karelia in Russia and the provinces of Northern and Southern Karelia and Savonia in Finland. Many became refuges from German Occupation (of ww2) and their numbers are very small today.

Source: Karelian Magic – Elder Mountain Dreaming