Unsocial Media

Journey through my Journal

Social media – “connecting” you to people on the other side of the world but not in the same room.

When did we start living through a screen? When did we start placing more importance on our social media “presence” than our actual presence? Our filterless, flawless and fabulous selves. Our lying on the couch in our sweatpants eating sour lollies loveable selves. The answer is irrelevant, what matters is where do we go from here? We weren’t taught how to cope with this devotion to self-promotion at school. There was no “how to survive without social media 101” or “how to love and accept yourself as a real person, not a profile 102”.

Do we continue to scroll through mindlessly judging, regretting, wishing and fantasising while staring blankly at a screen? With no external expression of emotion visible beside the occasional LOL from a good meme. We all do it…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Mirrors

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Mirror used to divine a future husband – “A girl who looks obliquely into a mirror when she first wakes up on May Day will see the reflection, or at least initials or letters forming the name, of the man who is to be her mate.” ~Randolph OMF 175-176

Mirror and well used to divine a future husband – “A maiden lady who wants to see her future husband goes to a well at noon on May 1 and holds a mirror so as to reflect the light down into the darkness. Some girls say that they have actually seen their mates-to-be in the water. Others are afraid to try this stunt, because sometimes a girl doesn’t see any man, but an image of herself in a coffin, which means that she’ll die before another May Day. If a girl sees nothing at all in the water, she is very…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – M – Milk

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Mother’s milk to treat sore eyes – “If a baby’s eyes are sore, the mother’s milk is regarded as the best possible lotion.” ~Randolph OMF 138

Sweet cream for eyes – “Young girls often rub sweet cream into their eyes, but I am not sure if this is a medicine or a cosmetic.” ~Randolph OMF 138

To wash off a curse – “…wash such clothing in milk and hang it out of doors over night in freezing weather; this is supposed to take the curse off somehow, so that the garments may be worn without danger.” ~Randolph OMF 292-293

Mare’s milk for whopping cough – “Cure for whooping cough. Drink mare’s milk every day and this will cure the whooping cough.” ~Parler FBA III 3879

Dreaming of milk – “It has always been good to dream of milk because it means peace and plenty.” ~Parler FBA XV 11375


Parler, Mary…

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Vikings

secretsoftheserpent

The Viking Era is believed to be from 792-1066 CE. The Vikings were north seafarers who traded and raided the North European homeland. Who were these people and where did they come from? Were they barbaric people like history tells us? In the last 10-15 years a lot of truth has come out about the Vikings, so why are we so slow to get the truth out about them?  With the truth of the Vikings coming out, it shatters the lies of human origins. Time to start shattering history.

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Ozark Encyclopedia – K – Knives

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Stolen knife for curing warts – “A prominent Arkansas lawyer tells me that in his boyhood the essential thing was to cut big notches in a stranger’s apple tree with a stolen knife, one notch for each wart to be removed. This was quite an undertaking, for knives were highly prized and hence difficult to steal. Even more serious was the fact that the people in the neighborhood were all acquainted, so that a boy had to travel a considerable distance before he could find a stranger’s apple tree.” ~Randolph OMF 130

Knife under pillow to “fetch” a male child – “Not many hillfolk practice any sort of magic to determine the sex of an unborn child, although some granny-women teach that parents may ‘fetch a boy’ by sticking a knife in the mattress…” ~Randolph OMF 196

Under pillow to prevent nightmares – “Some people are accustomed to place a…

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Welcome October: Pumpkins ~ Magic & Lore

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Good Witches Homestead

It is a magical time when the mundane laws of time and space are temporarily suspended, and the Thin Veil between the worlds is lifted. According to our Celtic Ancestors, this is the time the souls of people who had died that year make their journey to the Otherworld. During this thinning of the veil, spirits are said to roam the earth freely, and communicating with ancestors and departed loved ones is easier at this time. It’s also told that the Fairy Folk became very active, pulling pranks on unsuspecting humans. People use to dress in white (like ghosts), wear disguises made of straw, or dress as the opposite gender in order to fool the spirits and traveling after dark was not advised. The holiday’s bonfires and glowing turnips (yes, turnips) helped the dead on their journey while protecting the living.

So, let’s talk about the Halloween pumpkin … Pumpkins…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Horseshoe

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

To protect a house from witchcraft – “Probably the commonest way to keep witches out of the house is to nail a horseshoe over the door; this is regarded as a sort of general prophylactic against witches, bad luck, contagious disease, and other evil influences. Many hillmen insist that it doesn’t work unless the open end of the horseshoe is upward, but the reason for this has never been explained to me.” ~Randolph OMF 283

To keep witches from the butter churn – “Some people put a horseshoe into the churn…Most of them say simply a horseshoe, but sometimes one hears that it should be a hot horseshoe. It may be that a hot horseshoe really would make the butter come, and not by any supernatural spells, either.” ~Randolph OMF 295

“If your butter won’t come, the cream is bewitched. The spell can be broken by heating a horseshoe and…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – H – Hornet’s Nest

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Hung in cabin for good luck – “An empty hornets’ nest is hung up in the loft of nearly every old-time mountain cabin, and I have seen such a nest tied to the rafters of a new house that had not yet been occupied; some people say that this brings good fortune to the whole household, particularly in connection with childbirth and other sexual matters.” ~Randolph OMF 75

Used for sore eyes – “I have known old people who went to a great deal of trouble to obtain pieces of hornets’ nests, which they used to wipe their spectacles. Not only does this stuff clean the lenses better than the finest cloth or paper, they say, but it is somehow good for sore and tired eyes.” ~Randolph OMF 189

Hung up to ease birth pains – “There are some old people who always make sure that an empty hornets’ nest…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – D – Dirt Dauber’s Nest

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Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Crushed for skin issues – “I have seen skin eruptions treated with mud supplied by crushing dirt-dobbers’ nests and adding water mud from these nests is credited with some astringent virtue not found in ordinary earth.” ~Randolph OMF 110

Crushed and used for diaper rash – “Mama would take a dirt daubber’s nest when a baby had a diaper rash. She’d go out and get one and mash it up until it was powdery. Then she’d put it in a white cloth and tie a string around it and powder it on the baby’s bottom. It cleared the diaper rash up.” ~Carter and Krause HRIO 31

For a boil – “Take a dirt dobber’s nest and powder it. Put it into a thin cloth and dust on a boil or open sore.” ~Parler FBA II 1563

For a sprained ankle – “For sprained ankle make a poultice from dirt dauber’s…

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Elder Mountain Dreaming