Education

secretsoftheserpent

Where does our modern education system in the west come from? Many believe our educational systems, public or private, are the process of facilitating leaning or acquiring knowledge, values, skills, beliefs and habits that will help them improve their status or position in this world. Education has not been about uplifting and enlightening, but has always been about social control. Plato’s Academy and Alexandria were places of learning. Problems were posed here to be studied and solved by others. Members were encouraged to discover the simplest solutions. Both of these places encouraged freedom of thought and they were both destroyed.

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Obsolete phrase: “independence of mind”

Jon Rappoport's Blog

Obsolete phrase: “independence of mind”

by Jon Rappoport

August 22, 2017

Like a car with high fins and long protruding tail lights, the phrase “independence of mind” has gone out of style, especially at colleges and universities where it ought to be the most profound ideal. The thugs have taken over.

As recently as 2008, a professor of Jurisprudence at King’s College London, Timothy Macklem, described the phrase in this fashion:

“Independence of Mind [explores] the ways in which the fundamental freedoms help us to achieve something even more profound, by enabling us to arrive at beliefs, convictions and voices of our own, so that we truly come to think, believe, and speak for ourselves in the rich and various ways that the freedoms then protect. Privacy grants us the distance and refuge from others necessary to develop views of our own; freedom of speech calls on us to…

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The Individual vs. the Staged Collective

Jon Rappoport's Blog

The Individual vs. the Staged Collective

by Jon Rappoport

July 9, 2017

Trumpets blare. In the night sky, spotlights roam. A great confusion of smoke and dust and fog, and emerging banners, carrying the single message:

WE.

The great meltdown of all consciousness into a glob of utopian simplicity…

There are denizens among us.

They present themselves as the Normals.

Beyond all political objectives, there is a simple fact: those group-mind addicts who have given up their souls will rage against the faintest appearance of one who tries to keep his. And in this rage, the soulless ones will try to pull the other down to where they live.

And somehow, it all looks normal and proper and rational.

In the 1950s, before television had numbed minds and turned them into jelly, there was a growing sense of: the Individual versus the Corporate State.

Something needed to be done. People…

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What is the culture of Planet Earth?

Jon Rappoport's Blog

What is the culture of Planet Earth?

By Jon Rappoport

Seen from afar, the predominant culture of Earth has always favored war. War, control, aggression, and slavery of one kind or another, under the sway of small elite groups.

The current fad called collectivism, stripped of its feel-good propaganda, is simply another form of control.

None of this has anything to do with private property or freedom and independence of the individual. These ideas and practices have been corrupted, and utilized to create monopolies.

Earth culture has also always embodied leaders and followers. One cannot exist without the other. The leaders accumulate force (soldiers, priests, spies, etc.) and then try to coerce and dupe the rest of the population into opting for hatred aimed at some opponent.

In truth, the bulk of humanity has always been loath to participate in the war culture. Their natural state is tolerance and friendship…

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The free and independent individual « Jon Rappoport’s Blog

By Jon Rappoport

“Now we have a whole army of experts, whose job is to tell you success only comes with you being part of a group. Your status as an individual is transmitted to you through some diabolical portion of your brain that is loaded with false messages. Therefore, give up on the greatest adventure in the world. Take the elevator down to the basement, get off, and join the crowd. That’s where the love is. That’s where your useless courage dissolves into sugar, and the chorus of complaints will be magically transformed into a paradise of the lowest common denominator. Give up the ghost. You’re home. The sun never rises or sets. Nothing changes. The same sameness rules.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Since the 1960s, many people have decided that, in order to create the future they want, they should engage in a certain amount of introspection.

Spiritual or psychological introspection.

I have encountered a large number of such people, who have swung the balance to the point where introspection has become indecision and paralysis.

There are “so many issues to consider.”

Starting in the 1960s, we saw the import of various Eastern philosophies and practices. They arrived here in diluted and distorted forms. They introduced their own versions of “karma” and “balance” and “surrender” and “abdication to the wishes of the universe.”

“If it doesn’t happen, it wasn’t meant to be.”

In the end, it amounts to waiting around in a cosmic station for a train that never arrives.

Or in psychological terms, it is: “I have to resolve my past before I can pursue my future.” “How can I know what I want if I’m trapped in past conflicts?”

The effect of all this was to diminish the potential realm of human action. It was a kind of court case where all the priors of the defendant were allowed into evidence and dominated the verdict.

More recently, another limiter came on to the scene. It is expressed this way: “Now I see through fake reality, I see how reality is being manipulated by the powers-that-be, so what can I do? We’re at the mercy of these forces.”

I could suggest that these vectors were and are an intentional operation, whose purpose is to demoralize the individual and cut him off from his own freedom, independence, and power. And that would be an accurate assessment. But it wouldn’t tell the whole story, for one vital reason:

The individual is the only person who can change his own course. Others can help, but the final decision is his.

That is bedrock.

And here is the superior principle: even if the individual determines that all is hopeless, he should launch his life anyway. Despite all the good reasons to give up, he should ignore all of them and launch his future.

Because if he does that, he soon begins to see his own view change. It’s not the same anymore.

And this is what freedom and independence and power are all about. Bottom line, these qualities are what you take hold of after you know all is hopeless. That’s the acid test.

Every individual, since the dawn of time, has thought himself into smaller and smaller boxes until there is no space left—and then certain individuals, who are spiritual and metaphysical riverboat gamblers, have shoved in all their chips on projecting action in the world anyway…and they revolutionize their destinies.

That’s what some people have called “inequality of outcome.” That’s the basis for it.

We can go even deeper. What is the ultimate purpose of thought and reflection and introspection? Is it to arrive at certain conclusions, after which the thinker (the person) serves those conclusions like a slave? Or is thought itself a process through which ideas then serve the individual and his goals?

It is the latter.

The first great philosopher of the West, Plato, followed the first path. Which is to say, he applied his mind to understand the basis of reality, and he came to the conclusion that there were immortal and pure Ideas that existed in a higher realm, and they were unchangeable. Society, therefore, could only triumph if certain wise men, who could apprehend these Ideas directly, ruled over everyone else. Thus, the freedom and independence and power of open inquiry led to totalitarianism. Freedom led to slavery.

The individual, when all is said and done, is his own ship. However much he may learn about navigation, there comes the moment when he and his ship leave the shore. He explores. He discovers. He invents.

He invents his own future. No matter what.

We would be fools if we didn’t realize that, down through human history, individuals have grasped, for themselves, all these points.

And when the American Republic was invented, these same points were “background.” What were the checks and balances and the separation of powers all about? What was the reason for the enumeration of federal powers and the granting of all other powers to the states and the people? Why was the federal government squeezed at its extremities? Because the free and independent individual was the true coin of the realm. He needed latitude. He needed legal protection, in the best way it could be provided, from arbitrary power.

Otherwise, why bother?

The Constitution was far more than an extension of independence from England. The men who wrote the Articles and the Bill of Rights, and the men who voted for them and ratified them—to now argue for or against their “deeper motives” is, in the end, a distraction from the fact that the Constitution contains ideas that aid the liberation of the free and independent individual.

The ideas still stand.

They are predicated on the notion that these individuals exist and will launch, despite all reasons not to, their own creative desires and make them fact in the world.

Give us your huddled masses yearning to be free. Masses? No. A mass can never be free. And even if a mass can successfully demand freedom, on whom does that bounty then fall? The individual. This is where the buck stops, and no one can change that truth.

There are those who believe a quiet lake is the end of all existence. And then a boat comes along, and the ripples begin spreading. An individual has arrived.

You can be the person looking at the lake, banking on no-action, or you can be in the boat, forwarding your best ideas and visions and dreams, despite all the reasons not to.

Source: The free and independent individual « Jon Rappoport’s Blog

Why do you read this blog? « Outside the Reality Machine

By Jon Rappoport

 

I’m making a few assumptions.

 

You have your own idea about what “the reality machine” is.  It may not be a perfectly formed idea, but it’s there, and you know there’s something very important and interesting about what sits outside that machine.  You know the machine has something to do with imposed limitations on the mind.  You think about offloading those limitations.

 

You consider the possibility that imagination is relevant to what sits outside the reality machine.  Imagination isn’t preoccupied with what already exists in the world or in the mind.  That’s a clue.  Imagination journeys into untapped realms.  You wonder about just how powerful imagination can be.

 

In the course of your life, you’ve had moments when limitations went away.  How and why that happened may not be clear, but the experiences were vivid, and you can still remember some of them.  The clouds parted.  The gates opened.

 

And what I keep saying, in one way or another, is: imagination is the key.  It’s the key to offloading limitations.

 

That’s because imagination doesn’t care about repeating, over and over, what is already known and understood and perceived.  That repetition doesn’t disclose what sits outside the machine.

 

To exit the environs of the machine, you need to deploy the faculty you’ve always had, the faculty that never goes away, the faculty that leads you into unexplored territory.  It’s not enough to “try to change what you perceive,” in order to see beyond the machine.  You need to invent.

 

Imagine. […]

The entire article at the Source: Why do you read this blog? « Outside the Reality Machine

Plato’s Cave

I love the parable of Plato’s Cave. It shows just how long the controllers of this world have had a vice on our minds. Plato died in 348 BCE. If he was writing about it in his lifetime, it had to have been going on quite some time before that. He says that the people in this cave do not desire to leave their prison; for they know no better life. The people who are enlightened or have “woken up”, understand what this story is all about.

Plato begins by saying “Imagine a cave where people have been imprisoned since birth”. Right off the bat Plato is pointing to the human race. He says the prisoners are chained so they can only look forward. Here he is showing how from the time of birth we are told what to think and how to think. The chains are the chains on the mind. The people behind the prisoners put on a puppet show. This is a perfect analogy for what even goes on today. Television makes it so much easier for the leaders of this world to put their puppet show on. Make no mistake, that is exactly what it is, a puppet show for the masses. The prisoners naming the things before them is showing that this goes on in every culture. What one culture may call a game soccer, another culture will call it football. Plato says “The truth to the prisoners would be nothing more than the shadows of the puppets”. Just like today, the truth to people is only what they are told by our puppet show masters.

Read the rest of this great article at the Source: Plato’s Cave