Herbals, Plants

Learn About the Incredibly Nourishing Oil for Hair, Skin and Nails: Hemp Seed Oil

Astrology

Uranus In Taurus (2018-2026)

Elder Mountain Dreaming

The Thunder God Uranus, known as Thor, rules Electricity & Technology and these rule the foundation and fabric of our human societies today, and that keeps it running. Every 84 years, Uranus enters Taurus, but this time, the circumstances of modern society changes everything….

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Herbals

Herbs that Boost Collagen Naturally

Good Witches Homestead

WHAT IS COLLAGEN?

Collagen is the most abundant protein in our bodies, especially as a Type 1 collagen. It’s found in our muscles, bones, skin, blood vessels, digestive system, and tendons. It’s what helps give our skin strength and elasticity while also replacing dead skin cells. When it comes to joints and tendons — in the simplest terms — it’s the glue that binds the body together.

Healthy skin, nails, bones, and connective tissue need collagen to be strong and radiant. Collagen production naturally declines as we age — for most of us at least — yet if you nourish and intake high-quality collagen sources, you can begin to defy the classic aging process.

How Does Collagen Support The Body?

A fascinating element that a lot of these herbs share in common is their energetic and chemical properties. The bone-mending type of herbs is naturally high in silica, calcium, and…

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Food, Wild Foodism

Can This Wild Edible Mushroom Cause Cancer? Here’s What I Discovered

Greetings!

Classifying wild mushrooms as edible or not edible isn’t as straightforward as one may think.  Confusing matters even more, the labels edible and poisonous aren’t always clearly defined either.

Take the mushroom pictured above, for example.

Its name is the Late Fall Oyster, and this wild mushroom is listed in many field guides as edible.  It’s no surprise, then, that countless hungry mushroom enthusiasts forage and eat the Late Fall Oyster every year.

However, if you do a little digging around online, you’ll eventually encounter the warning that the Late Fall Oyster is potentially carcinogenic.  Consequently, many people recommend against eating this fungus due to the possibility that it may contain cancer-causing compounds.

I’ve heard both sides of the story, and having eaten the Late Fall Oyster in the past, I was recently inspired to discover any “truth” to this issue.  After a little bit of work and research, I received some answers.

If you’d like to learn more about the controversial status regarding the Late Fall Oyster’s edibility, check out the brand new video!

If you love Eastern Skunk Cabbage, thank a fungus!  It may not seem obvious, though fungi contribute immensely to the health and success of wetland habitats.  To learn more about this intimate relationship between two very different organisms, check out the recent Instagram post!

Thanks for reading and watching, and as always, thank you for your support!

-Adam Haritan

Herbals, Plants

Lavender for Body and Soul

Good Witches Homestead

Lavenders have everything for the modern garden as an amenity plant. They are
evergreen, fast-growing, compact and fragrant. The origins of its name are
probably from the Latin word Lavare indicating the plant has another use as it
means to be washed and suggests it was regularly used to perfume bathing water.
There are numerous references to other qualities of lavender in Roman times – such
as a cure for mild epilepsy and as a laxative. The production of lavender for
aromatherapy, perfumery and alternative medical purposes are now well developed
in countries where various species of lavender are found naturally i.e. from the
The Mediterranean to the Middle East, India, North Africa, and Asia.

Climatic Factors

Lavender production requires dry roots and shoots, free draining soils and
reasonable light levels. Low fertility sandy soils are ideal with a Ph range of 6.0 to
7.0. When selecting suitable sites frost…

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Astrology, Crystals & Stones, Ritual tools, Spiritual Toolbox

SOME POST-ECLIPSE CRYSTAL + AKASHIC GUIDANCE

By Krista Mitchell

Post-Eclipse Crystal + Akashic Guidance / krista-mitchell.com

Hello everyone! Recovering from that epic full moon eclipse this past week?

Key word seems to be PURGE – a lot of things coming up for people to heal and release.

In turn, this has created clarity, space, and focus on how we lead our lives, which we can now use to co-create a new, different, or better reality!

What’s exciting is that in less than two weeks we have THREE occurrences ushering in energy to support our new paradigms:

Imbolc, from the evening of February 1st – 2nd, is a Goddess festival celebrating the return of the maiden Spring and a blessing of the land. I’ll be writing more about this for you next week!

The new moon in Aquarius on Monday the 4th.

The Lunar New Year (year of the piggie-wiggie!) on the 5th.

BUT FIRST! Before we gallop gaily into fresh pastures, we need to make sure we’re on solid ground.

 

Continue reading “SOME POST-ECLIPSE CRYSTAL + AKASHIC GUIDANCE”

Herbals, Plants, Ritual tools, Spiritual Toolbox

Recipe: Wildcrafted Herbal Blessing Oil

The Druid's Garden

A herbal blessing oil is a simple magical tool that you can make that directly comes from the living earth. The herbal blessing oil can be used to bless tools, seed balls, trees, yourself, other people, or anything else you like. You can include it as part of your Druid’s Crane Bag. Your own unique blend of herbs and wildcrafted ingredients will make it an amazing and potent tool for your practice.  While druidry doesn’t use oils extensively, other traditions, like the American folk magic and Hoodoo, use oils a lot to dress candles and do other kinds of energetic work.

Choosing Plant Material

You can harvest material from one plant or from a variety of plants and combine them. Here are some possibilities for you:

  • Lavender, Sage, Rosemary, Thyme, Lemon Balm, Majoram, – Garden herbs that offer healing and protection.  Add one or more of these as…

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Food, Gardens, Odds & Ends

Urbalive Worm Farm: Making worm composting indoors a simple process

Life & Soul Magazine

There’s a myriad of choices when it comes to composting, and if you live in a small space with no access to a garden, worm composting, in particular, is still an option. Urbalive Worm Farm is an indoor kit for composting kitchen bio waste with red worms.

Designed by Czech designer Jan Pelcl, the Urbalive Worm Farm is a stylish container which stands on wooden stilts, like a stool. Its modern design is made up of composting layers where worms help create vermicompost leading to a container where the worm tea collects.

Vermicompost contains essential enzymes and natural growth hormones that are great for soil fertility and feeding gardens. Worm tea is rich in natural nutrients and enzymes that help plants grow strong and healthy. The tea can be mixed with water and added to soil in flower pots and plants for use as food.

By following a few simple basic rules,

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Gardens, Plants

January Gardening In The Low Desert

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

January is generally a slow month for gardening in the low desert. Take advantage of this “quiet” time by preparing and planning for the upcoming spring months.

January is a good time to prepare a new vegetable garden bed for spring planting. Prepare your vegetable bed by using a digging fork or rototilling to approximately 12-18 inches deep. Do not work soil if it is too wet as it can permanently damage the soil structure. Apply compost generously (several inches) and incorporate it into the loosened soil. If you have an existing vegetable garden this is also a good time to add compost.

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Continue to protect cold-tender plants including Euphorbia spp., Adenium spp., Pachypodium spp. and sub-tropical cacti.  Many aloes will be blooming at this time and flowers may need to be protected if we have frost events. Aloe clumps can be divided at this time.

Mesquites will begin to…

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Health, Herbals, Plants

Lavender and Aromatherapy

Good Witches Homestead

Lavender is one of those scents that have the power to evoke the senses.  Most notably, feelings of relaxation and well-being.  In fact, it was long believed that Cleopatra’s secret weapon, in love, was Lavender.

Calm and refreshing it’s not surprising the word Lavender in Latin (Lavoie) means for wash or bathe.  Because of its sweet aroma, it was widely used in Europe as a herb to wash linen.  Later, Lavender’s antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties were discovered, giving rise to its use as an aid to bug bites, burns, and skin abrasions.  This essential oil is also used to repel mosquitoes.  Planting Lavender in one’s garden is a great way to naturally repel unwanted pests.  If you like to make your own honey, bees LOVE Lavender flowers or if you prefer to buy honey, you can make a Lavender honey infusion using dried Lavender buds…

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