Symbolism of Violet: February Birth Flower

Good Witches Homestead

The violet has a charming and long history of mythology. Greek myth states that Zeus fell in love with Io. Zeus was afraid that Hera, his wife, would discover him and Io, so he made Io into a white heifer. Zeus created the sweet-scented flower that we know as the violet for Io to eat while she was a heifer. Hera placed an insect pest on Io as the white heifer, so she roamed all over the land trying to free herself from the pest.  Zeus finally caught the heifer and put his hand on her, and she turned back into Io. She gave birth to their child, who founded many nations.

Another Greek myth states that Persephone, a young lady, was walking in a field of violets when Hades saw her and fell in love with her. Hades took her to his kingdom of death and the world became…

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Taking up the Path of the Bard III: Practice makes Perfect

The Druid's Garden

“You have so much talent” or “I’m talented enough” are powerful statements, statements I hear on a regular basis from those who long for a creative practice. The idea of talent can cause an incredible amount of inaction, of people not feeling they are “good enough” to even try.  I see this, in particular, with the visual arts. But the first time you put pen to paper, if you aren’t Picasso or Monet, you might as well forget about it. This larger cultural ideal, of course, seems at odds with the druid tradition where Eisteddfod and the channeling of Awen are central to our spiritual life. In the druid tradition, creativity isn’t about producing something of commercial value or high quality, its about the channeling of creativity for spiritual purposes. But for those coming out of mainstream Western culture with all of the cultural baggage, this can be difficult to…

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The Medicinal Properties and Health Benefits of Violets.

Good Witches Homestead

Violets have been known throughout history as a healing herb. An example that was proven by research was that Viola odorata contains phenolic glycosides, flavonoids, saponins, alkaloids, mucilage, and tannins among other things. These compounds work in several ways to cure ailments.

Violets have been known throughout history as a healing herb. Hippocrates, in the ancient times, classified the violet as a “moist” plant, which is best used for treating liver disorders as well as bad tempers. In the 16th century, the English used syrups made from violets for their laxative properties. Violet remedies were also used for pleurisy, epilepsy, and jaundice. Culpepper, a 17th-century herbalist states that “All the violets are cold and moist while they are fresh and green, and are used to cool any heat or distemperature of the body.” He personally recommends the use of violet concoctions to treat various skin and eye disorders, as well…

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