Astrorisa Moon Forecaster ~ October 31, 2020 Forecast

October 31, 2020 Forecast 

Taurus Full Moon

Hunter’s Moon

Blood Moon

Blue Moon

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Getting Spooky | Full Blue Crone Moon Hag’s Candle DIY Ritual

Full Blue Crone Moon Hag’s Candle DIY Ritual

This Full Moon is our second Full Moon this month making it a Blue Moon. Full moons offer us illumination and insight. Our intuition is increased and our third eye is open at this time. A Blue Moon offers us a second chance towards illumination.

This is also the Crone Moon and Samhain. The Crone Moon represents ancestral wisdom, intuitive knowing and crone energy. On this Samhain Full Moon, the veil is at its thinnest, and our intuition is at its strongest.

Full Blue Crone Moon Hag’s Candle DIY Ritual

The word Samhain means “Summer’s End.” It marks the end of the harvest season, and acts as a way to celebrate the darker months ahead.

A great way to celebrate this time of year is by tapping into fire magick.

Making a “Hag’s candle” on Samhain to be used in the coming winter helps us tap into the Crone Moon energy while we prepare for colder and darker months ahead.

A Hag’s Candle is a candle made from the stalk of a mullein plant.

Mullein is a wild plant that grows almost everywhere. Mullein is great for the lungs, stomach and infection. In folklore, Mullein is said to keep away evil spirits. It offers protection, illumination, courage and crone magick.

Read original article at: Spirit de la Lune ~ Getting Spooky|Full Blue Crone Moon Hag’s Candle DIY Ritual

Strange Moon and Moon Work Oct.29, 2020 ~ Astrorisa Moon

ASTRORISA MOON IN THE LOFT

Strange Moon and Moon Work Oct.29, 2020

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EVER HAD A BAD REACTION TO A CRYSTAL?

Ever Had a Bad Reaction to a Crystal / www.krista-mitchell.com

So you get this new crystal and you’re excited to start working with it:

You wear it or meditate with it, but instead of feeling good from it, you feel off, or negative, or sick.

You have bad dreams, or get angry when you hold it, or some terrible memory surfaces.

Maybe you can’t sleep at all when it’s around. Or you get a bad headache. Or feel even more anxious, stressed, or depressed than before.

What gives? You thought crystals were supposed to help you feel better, not worse!

Having a bad reaction to a crystal is actually not so uncommon – it’s something I’m asked about on a weekly basis.

“What does it mean?” And, “what do I do with the crystal?”

I will always remember my first adverse reaction to a crystal: malachite. It was placed on my heart chakra in a healing session for 45 minutes, and for the next 3 days I was a complete and total hot mess. Despondent, depressed, crying, couldn’t leave my apartment. It was awful.

I asked the healer about it, and she replied: “Oh, well malachite draws repressed emotions to the surface, so that’s probably why.”

“You should have told me that first before placing it on me!” I cried. And then cried…

This is why I always caution my Pro Crystal Healer students that a) you can have a bad reaction to crystals, and b) you have to advise your clients, first, before using powerful crystals like malachite, moldavite, covellite, and other deep transformational stones in a healing session, and allow them the right to refuse if they don’t feel ready to handle the possible response.

And here’s another thing that I consistently caution to everyone working with healing stones: crystals can do harm.

Just because they’re natural does not automatically mean they’re good for you – think snake venom, poisonous berries, and toxic minerals. They’re all natural, too, but definitely not good for you.

Crystals can create imbalance just as easily as they can restore balance.

That being said, just because you’ve had an adverse reaction to a crystal does not necessarily mean that it’s doing you harm – sometimes the act of restoring balance only feels like it’s bad when it’s actually a good thing.

Let me explain…

Read original article at: Krista Mitchell ~ Ever Had A Bad Reaction To A Crystal?

Reflections On Eating One Of The Strangest Mushrooms In The World

Stinkhorns, with their presumptuous shapes and foul odors, are truly some of the strangest creatures in the biological world.  Any rational person could be forgiven for assuming that such bizarre fungi couldn’t possibly be edible.

Fortunately, however, nature isn’t always rational, and foul-smelling entities with presumptuous shapes can sometimes be eaten.

Take Ravenel’s Stinkhorn, for instance.

This strongly-scented fungus grows in wood chips and along trails during the autumn months.  As it turns out, Ravenel’s Stinkhorn is considered to be edible with one caveat:  only its immature “eggs” are supposedly fit to be eaten.

During a recent walk, I encountered quite a few of these funny-looking stinkhorns growing alongside their primordial eggs.  Rather than snap a few photographs and flee the scene, I decided to harvest a few eggs and see for myself just how edible these quirky creatures could be.

If you are interested in hearing my candid thoughts on eating one of the strangest mushrooms in the world, check out the brand new video!

Speaking of strange fungi, this odd-looking pair inhabits forests in eastern North America and performs critical roles in maintaining the health of oak trees.  Check out this recent Instagram post to learn more.Click to view post

Thanks for reading and watching, and thanks for your continued support!

-Adam Haritan

Nature Mandalas for Inner Work, Rituals, and Blessings

The Druid's Garden

A woman comes to a clearing in the recently burned forest with a basket of stones, sticks, nuts, and flowers.  She begins to sing, laugh, and dance as she creates a beautiful circle with the materials. As she weaves her healing magic, the design of the circle grows more complex, spiraling inward and outward.  She finishes her work and sits with it quietly for a time, before leaving it in place to do its own work.  A healing mandala has been made on that spot, to help the forest recover after a fire.

Nature mandalas can be used for a variety of inner work, healings, blessings and rituals and are a wonderful addition to a druid or natural spiritual practice. Nature mandalas are an intuitive magical and bardic arts practice that works with the connection of your own subconscious to the living earth.  You use materials that are local to…

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HSA Webinar: Molé, Pan and Chapulin–Oaxacan Style

The Herb Society of America Blog

by Jen Munson, HSA Education Chair

Face it, 2020, for the most part, has been a bust! The pandemic has cancelled events, reduced travel, and all but eliminated herbal adventures. As we dream of a future where we can begin to move about the globe more easily and safely, now is the perfect time to research new destinations. mapInterestingly, just south of the US border in Mexico there is a unique community that is home to sixteen distinct indigenous peoples living in a mild climate, enjoying unique botanic diversity. 

Oaxaca, Mexico, is a community known for its culture, crafts, textiles, ceramics, cuisine, and complex use of plants. While Mexico is known for its Day of the Dead celebrations, Oaxaca offers the most spiritual and unique Dia de los Muertos Celebrationcelebrations of them all. The Day of the Dead festival (or Dia de los Muertos) is celebrated from October 31st thru November 2nd. During this…

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HSA Webinar: Hamlet’s Poison: The Mystery of Hebanon & Shakespeare’s Other Deadly Plants

The Herb Society of America Blog

By Jen Munson, HSA Education Chair

‘There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember: and there is pansies. that’s for thoughts.’ (Hamlet 4.5.248)

William Shakespeare’s poetic plays are filled with dramatic imagery and references to plants, herbs, trees, vegetables, and other botanicals. Shakespeare’s awareness of the botanical world was near the level of herbalists of that period, and the use of plants throughout his plays is done with unparalleled sophistication. They are used to enhance ideas and describe characters, as well as for metaphors. For example, Hamlet describes the state of Denmark as “…an unweeded garden / That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature” (Hamlet 1.22.134-136). 

Plants are used for evil doings and central plot development. They are transformed into potions that are  lust invoking, (Viola tricolor in Midsummer Nights Dream), sleep inducing (Atropa belladonna in Romeo and Juliet), and as poisons…

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Creating Sacred Space

How’s the energy in your space

I’ve been thinking a lot about our spaces lately – in many ways they’ve become more important to us than ever, and a place where many of us are now spending most of our time (or not enough).

The space we live in is an energetic extension of ourselves. What affects us will affect the energy of our space (and vice versa).

In a time when we’ve seen a dramatic increase in fear, stress, uncertainty, and an outpouring of negativity, the more we can hold ourselves + our spaces sacred, the more we all benefit.

While we may all know the importance of clearing the energy of our space, it bears reminding, especially given that some may be feeling too overwhelmed or tired to prioritize it (it’s been my experience that this is when we most need to do it).

Continue reading “Creating Sacred Space”

Sacred Tree Profile: Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana)’s Magic, Medicine, and Mythology

The Druid's Garden

Witch Hazel in Flower, late October

As we move into the dark half of the year and move closer to Samhain, the temperatures drop, the killing frosts come and the plants die back. The leaves grow brilliant and then fall.  Brown and tan dominate the land as the earth falls asleep. But there in the waning light is the brilliant, beautiful golden yellow of the  Witch hazel!  Around here, Witch Hazel (Hamamelis Virginia) begins a magnificent display of tiny yellow flowers, appearing to explode outward with many delicate yellow petals.  As the last of the leaves fall, if you walk through a forest with Witch Hazel, you are struck by the beauty of these wild and warm yellow flowers. everything else may look dead, but Witch Hazel is alive and thriving. The time of Witch Hazel is the time of late fall and early winter, and it is a powerful…

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