Medicinal Herbs: Arnica

Good Witches Homestead

Arnica {Arnica montana}

Arnica has been an important topical healing herb since the 15th century. It is a member of the large and varied Asteraceae, or Composite family, along with sunflowers, daisies, lettuce, and chicory. This perennial herb originated in the mountains of Europe and Siberia and is now widely cultivated in North America.

The plant’s genus name derives from arna, Greek for “lamb,” because of the soft, fleecy hair on its green leaves. It reaches an average height of one to two feet and produces daisy-like yellow-orange flowers that begin to bloom in May.

Healing Properties

Arnica’s flower heads, either fresh or dried, are the base of creams, salves, ointments, liniments, or tinctures that are applied to the skin to treat muscle aches, sprains, strains, and bruises. Arnica can also be useful in treating superficial phlebitis, inflamed insect bites, and swelling from broken bones. There…

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Third New Moon of Autumn

Vibration

secretsoftheserpent

This is what the Hermetic says about vibration and is the Third Hermetic Principal.
Nothing rests. Everything is moving. Everything vibrates. At the most fundamental level, the universe and everything which comprises it is pure vibratory energy manifesting itself in different ways. The universe has no ‘solidity’ as such. Matter is merely energy in a state of vibration. Everything is constantly in motion at all times. The only difference is the speed of the vibrations.

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Medicinal Herbs: Clary Sage

Good Witches Homestead

Clary Sage {Salvia sclarea}

Clary Sage is an ancient herb that has been used by many cultures to medicate the eyes and treat a variety of diseases. This biennial member of the mint family, Lamiaceae, is native to the northern Mediterranean, parts of North Africa, and Central Asia. It is now a commercial crop in the Mediterranean, Russia, the United States, England, Morocco, and Central Europe, cultivated primarily for its essential oils. It still grows wild in many places.

The plant begins as a rosette, and, by its second year, produces strong, hairy stems that reach an average height of three feet. The large, downy green leaves are paired and show a hint of purple. The herb produces lush spikes of lilac or blue flowers that bloom from spring to mid-summer and attract bees and other pollinators.

Healing Properties

Written records of the herb’s healing powers go…

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