African Plant Extract Offers New Hope for Alzheimer’s

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

A plant extract used for centuries in traditional medicine in Nigeria could form the basis of a new drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease, researchers at The University of Nottingham have found.

Their study, published in the journal Pharmaceutical Biology, has shown that the extract taken from the leaves, stem, and roots of Carpolobia lutea, could help to protect chemical messengers in the brain which play a vital role in functions including memory and learning.

The tree extract could pave the way for new drugs to tackle patient symptoms but without the unwanted side-effects associated with some current treatments.

The study was led by Dr. Wayne Carter in the University’s Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine, based at Royal Derby Hospital. He said: “As a population, we are living longer, and the number of people with dementia is growing at an alarming rate. Our findings suggest that…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – D – Dandelion

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Dandelion – Taraxacum sp.

Parts used: root, leaf, flower

Traditional uses: Greens eaten. Poultice of steamed or wilted leaves applied to indolent ulcers. Greens eaten to purify the blood. Decoction of roots taken for stomach pain. Infusion of root used for blood. Infusion of herb used to calm nerves.

“Diuretic, tonic and slightly aperient. It is a general stimulant to the system, but especially to the urinary organs, and is chiefly used in kidney and liver disorders…Dandelion is used as a bitter tonic in atonic dyspepsia, and as a mild laxative in habitual constipation. When the stomach is irritated and where active treatment would be injurious, the decoction or extract of Dandelion administered three or four times a day, will often prove a valuable remedy. It has a good effect in increasing the appetite and promoting digestion.” ~Grieve MH

For coffee substitute; to keep away disease – “One old man…

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Mullein Herb Medicine and Warding Off Evil

Elder Mountain Dreaming

I am picking Mullein this week nearing the New Moon and Summer Solstice, and drying it to make some tea for my detox purification that I am doing for three months. I have never had sinus until the US Air Force started spraying (chemtrails) about 8 years ago pretty heavily. When they spray I do get some sinus blockage, and it seems Mullein breaks it up and of course that is good for my body. I have a Tea Recipe, Spray for those with (asthma) and general information I found around the web…

The large flowering stems of Mullein were dried by the ancient cultures and dipped in tallow, and then used as a lamp wick or for a torch. These torches were said to ward off evil spirits and witches, although witches had these in their herbal gardens and were not the bad guys. For those interested in a…

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Herbal Mixology Fall 2017 – Traditional Roots Institute

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

With Glen Nagel ND, herbal mixologist Back by popular demand! A three-part series focusing on blending botanicals into tasty tonics. Register on this page for the series, or follow links to register for classes a la carte. Blending the ancient world of botanical medicine with that of the modern bar mixologist, this class develops a flavorful …

Source: Herbal Mixology Fall 2017 – Traditional Roots Institute

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Ozark Encyclopedia – C – Cucumber Tree

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Cucumber Tree – Magnolia acuminata

Parts used: root, bark

Traditional uses: Infusion of bark taken for stomachache or cramps. Infusion of bark used for toothache.

“A mild diaphoretic, tonic, and aromatic stimulant. It is used in rheumatism and malaria and is contra-indicated in inflammatory symptoms. In the Alleghany districts the cones are steeped in spirits to make a tonic tincture. A warm infusion is laxative and sudorific, a cold one being antiperiodic and mildly tonic.” ~Grieve MH 

Spicebush and cucumber tree for dropsy – “Spice bush tea…and cucumber tree…bark are good for dropsey.” ~Parler FBA II 2074

For rheumatism – “Cucumber tree…tea cures rheumatism.” ~Parler FBA III 2976

“Cucumber tree…bark boiled makes a syrup, when put into a bottle let set, add whiskey, then drink along for rheumatism.” ~Parler FBA III 2977


Grieve, Margaret A Modern Herbal (MH)

Moerman, Daniel E. Native American Ethnobotany (NAE)

Parler, Mary Celestia Folk…

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Safety When You Use Herbs.

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Plants have the power to heal…but first, know these basics for safe and effective results.

Humans, like most mammals, have turned to plants for food and medicine since our earliest times. No doubt some of our ancestors suffered the consequences of unfortunate choices along the way.

Most of the herbs sold in the United States are safe when taken in recommended dosage. More than 38 million Americans use herbs each year, yet the majority of calls to Poison Control Centers about plant ingestion have to do with people {usually children} and pets eating the potentially poisonous house and garden plants, not medicinal herbs.

To ensure your experiences with medicinal herbs remain positive without inadvertent mishaps-follow these basic guidelines.

Start with Food Herbs

You can bet on safety when you use herbs as foods-think garlic, ginger, nettles, dandelion greens, shitake mushrooms, burdock root {also called gobo} and rose hips. Culinary herbs-thyme…

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Top 10 Health Benefits of Thyme

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

There are few things a sprig of thyme won’t make immensely better. This versatile herb blends well with a myriad of flavors and is packed full of health-promoting compounds, vitamins, antioxidants, and other nutrients.

Thyme belongs to the genus Thymus which is part of the mint family and closely related to oregano—another powerful herb. Native to the Southern Mediterranean regions, this perennial herb is now grown around the world for its culinary and therapeutic uses. While this herb will liven up your cooking, thyme may also help expel harmful organisms from your body and support your mental and physical health.

What Is Thyme?

Thyme is an evergreen herb that blooms with small white, pink, and purple flowers. They hybridize easily and grow quickly in sunny areas with well-drained soil. Thanks to its ease of cultivation and growth, there are over 300 varieties of thyme in existence today. Each variety has…

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Cedarwood Essential Oil

Good Witches Homestead

Cedarwood essential oil has a steady, reassuring strength.

It’s versatile, gentle, and powerful. It offers support in a wide range of blends, from respiratory inhalers to skin care creams, and both adults and children love its warm, woody aroma. Something about Cedarwood reminds me of sitting on a park bench under the shelter of a tall cedar tree.

In the blends below, I’m using three different Cedarwood essential oils: Cedrus atlantica, Cedrus deodara, and Juniperus virginiana. These three Cedarwoods are often good substitutes for each other, but I’ve included the Latin name in each blend so you’ll know exactly which Cedarwood I’m using.

1. Cedarwood connects us with our calm inner strength.

Cedarwood essential oil has the ability to see us through tough times. It can help us move steadily and securely through long projects . . . or through long, cold (sometimes dark) seasons like winter.

This…

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Patchouli Essential Oil

Good Witches Homestead

Patchouli has a reputation for being peaceful, even in the face of conflict, and connecting us with the earth.

It’s all about calm, ease, and natural beauty.

In my mind, Patchouli’s mental and emotional effects are reflected in what it can do for our bodies. It calms inflammation, soothes anxiety, reduces bacteria, is astringent, and helps skin to heal.

The recipes in this Spotlight showcase Patchouli’s talents nicely!


Patchouli essential oil a perfect ingredient for natural acne relief blends.

This recipe is popular with boys, who I’ve found don’t often gravitate toward floral fragrances (but girls love this blend, too!).

You can make this in a 1 oz (30 ml) flip-top bottle:

  • 1 oz (30 ml) aloe vera gel (Aloe barbadensis)
  • 5 drops Patchouli (Pogostemom cablin)
  • 5 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
  • 3 drops Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia)
  • 2 drops Lemon (Citrus…

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Ozark Encyclopedia – C – Cranesbill

I love seeing this along the roadsides in Western Maryland.

Mountain Man Traditional Healing

Cranesbill, Spotted – Geranium maculatum

Parts used: root, leaf, flower

Traditional uses: Astringent, compound decoction used as a wash for thrush in child’s mouth. Used for open wounds and to remove canker sores. Infusion of roots taken for diarrhea.

“Styptic, astringent, tonic. Used for piles and internal bleeding. Excellent as an injection for flooding and leucorrhoea, and taken internally for diarrhoea, children’s cholera, chronic dysentery; a good gargle.” ~Grieve MH

Brewed for sore throats – “Cranesbill (Geranium maculatum) is brewed into a fine astringent medicine for sore throats.” ~Randolph OMF 93

Root used as a “flux stopper” – “The root of a plant called cranesbill (Geraniummaculatum) is also a popular ‘flux stopper.’” ~Randolph OMF 97


Grieve, Margaret A Modern Herbal (MH)

Moerman, Daniel E. Native American Ethnobotany (NAE)

Randolph, Vance Ozark Magic and Folklore (OMF)

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